Etymology
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clothing (n.)

c. 1200, "action of dressing in clothes," verbal noun from clothe. From late 13c. as "clothes collectively, raiment, apparel;" 1590s as an adjective.

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no-man's-land (n.)

also no man's land, "terrain between front lines of entrenched armies," 1908, popularized in World War I; earlier a tract or district to which no one has an established claim; a region which is the subject of dispute between two parties" (by 1876). Nonemanneslond (early 14c.) was the name given to an unowned waste ground outside the north wall of London, the site of executions. No man (Old English nanne mon) was an old way of saying "nobody."

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eco- 
word-forming element referring to the environment and man's relation to it, abstracted from ecology, ecological; attested from 1969.
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clothe (v.)

"to put on garments; provide with clothing," Old English claðian, from claþ (see cloth). Related: Clothed, clothing. Other Old English words for this were scrydan and gewædian. Figurative sense "cover as with clothing" is from c. 1300.

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undress (v.)
1590s, "to shed one's clothing," from un- (2) "opposite of" + dress (v.). Transitive sense of "to strip off (someone's) clothing" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Undressed; undressing.
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raiment (n.)

c. 1400, "clothes, an article of clothing, vesture" (archaic), shortening of arayment "clothing" (late 14c.), from Anglo-French araiement, from Old French areement, from areer "to array" (see array (v.)).

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accoutrement (n.)

usually plural, accoutrements, "personal clothing and equipment," 1540s, from French accoustrement (Modern French accoutrement), from accoustrer, from Old French acostrer "arrange, dispose, put on (clothing)," probably originally "sew up" (see accouter).

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hand of glory (n.)
1707, originally a piece of mandrake root, translation of French maindeglorie, from a corruption of Latin mandragora "mandrake" (see mandrake). The dead man's hand charm is described from mid-15c., but not by this name.
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anthropogeny (n.)

"origination of the human race," 1833, from anthropo- + -geny. Related: Anthropogenesis "origination or evolution of man" (1862; from 1855 in German and French); anthropogony "doctrine of man's origin" (1847).

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hippocrepian (adj.)

"horseshoe-shaped," 1852, from Latinized form of Greek hippos "horse" (from PIE root *ekwo- "horse.") + krēpis "a boot, half-boot, man's high boot," which is of uncertain origin.

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