Etymology
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Malay (n.)

"native of the Malay peninsula or the adjecent islands," also "the language of the Malays," 1590s, from native (Austronesian) name Malayu. As an adjective from 1779; the earlier adjective form was Malayan (1660s).

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Malaysia 

federation comprising the southern end of the Malay peninsula (except Singapore) and the northwestern part of Borneo, from Malay + Latinate ending -ia. Originally an early 19c. British geographers' name for the Indonesian archipelago. Related: Malaysian.

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Moro 
"Muslim Malay of the Philippines," 1886, from Spanish Moro, literally "Moor" (see Moor).
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sarong (n.)

skirt-like garment worn over the lower body by both sexes, the Malay national garment, 1834, from Malay (Austronesian) sarung "sheath, covering." OED traces it to "some mod. form of Skr. saranga 'variegated.' "

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gecko (n.)
1774, from Malay (Austronesian) gekoq, said to be imitative of its cry. Earlier forms in English were chacco (1711), jackoa (1727).
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gourami (n.)
type of freshwater fish, 1834, earlier in French, from Malay (Austronesian) gurami.
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cassowary (n.)
"large, flightless bird of Australia and Papua," 1610s, via French or Dutch, from Malay (Austronesian) kasuari.
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Timor 
island in the East Indies, Malay (Austronesian) timur "east" (in reference to Java and Sumatra). Related: Timorese.
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Dyak 

one of a native race inhabiting Borneo, also their Austronesian language, by 1834, from Malay dayak "up-country."

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catecholamine (n.)

type of hormone, 1960, from catechol (1880), from catechu, 17c. name for an astringent substance used in medicines, dyeing, etc., which apparently is from Malay (Austronesian) kachu.

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