Etymology
Advertisement
Malagasy 

"pertaining to Madagascar," the large island off the southeast coast of Africa, 1835, apparently an alteration of Madagascar (compare French Malgache).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
raffia (n.)

fiber-yielding tree of Madagascar, 1729, rofia, from Malagasy rafia. Modern form is attested from 1882; also raphia (1866). As the name of a soft fiber made from the leaves of the plant by 1882.

Related entries & more 
indri (n.)

1839, European name for the babakoto, a lemur-like arboreal primate of Madagascar (Indris Lichanotus); the common story since late 19c. is that the name was given in error by French naturalist Pierre Sonnerat (1748-1814), c. 1780, from mistaken use of Malagasy indry! "Look! See!" this being what his native guides said when they spotted the creature and called his attention to it.

However, as Hacking (1981) pointed out, Sonnerat was far too familiar with indris — he described and figured them in detail, and apparently kept at least one in captivity — for this story to be plausible. Furthermore, endrina is actually recorded as a native name for the indri (Cousins, 1885), and indri could easily be a variant of this name. Although the word endrina is first recorded in Malagasy only in 1835, there is no evidence that it could be a back-formation from the French indri (Hacking, 1981), and it seems implausible that the Malagasy would adopt an erroneous French name for an animal they were them selves familiar with. [Dunkel, Alexander R., et al., "Giant rabbits, marmosets, and British comedies: etymology of lemur names, part 1," in "Lemur News," vol. 16, 2011-2012, p.67]
Related entries & more