Etymology
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Malaga (n.)

Spanish port, founded by the Phoenicians and the name is probably from Phoenician malha "salt." As the name of a white wine exported from there, c. 1600. Related: Malagueña "woman of Malaga," also the name of a Spanish dance.

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gringo (n.)
term for a European or Anglo-American, 1847, from American Spanish gringo "foreigner," from Spanish gringo "foreign speech, unintelligible talk, gibberish," perhaps ultimately from griego "Greek." The "Diccionario Castellano" (1787) says gringo was used in Malaga for "anyone who spoke Spanish badly," and in Madrid for "the Irish." Hence the American Spanish verb engringarse "to act like a foreigner."
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