Etymology
Advertisement
known (adj.)

mid-13c., knouen, "well-known, famous, notorious," past-participle adjective from know (v.). From early 14c. as "recognized, not secret; familiar, not strange." As a noun, "that which is known," by 1863; earlier "famous person" (1835). In Middle English it meant "one's acquaintances." To make (something) known is from mid-14c.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
love-making (n.)

"courtship," mid-15c.; see love (n.) + make (v.). Phrase make love is attested from 1570s in the sense "pay amorous attention to;" as a euphemism for "have sex," it is attested from c. 1950.

Related entries & more 
well-known (adj.)

late 15c., from well (adv.) + past participle of know (v.).

Related entries & more 
disclosure (n.)

1590s, "act of opening up to view, a making known or revealing;" see disclose + -ure. Formed in English, perhaps on model of closure. Meaning "that which is disclosed or made known" is by 1825.

Related entries & more 
intimation (n.)

mid-15c., "action of making known," from Old French intimation (14c.), from Late Latin intimationem (nominative intimatio) "an announcement," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin intimare "make known, announce, impress" (see intimate (adj.)). Meaning "action of expressing by suggestion or hint, indirect imparting of information" is from 1530s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
softball (n.)

baseball of larger than usual size, used in a scaled-down version of the game, 1914, from soft + ball (n.1). The game itself so called from 1916, also known as playground baseball. The word earlier was a term in sugar candy making (1894). Softball question, one that is easy to answer, is attested from 1976.

Related entries & more 
publication (n.)

late 14c., publicacioun, "the act of making publicly known, notification to the people at large," from Old French publicacion (14c.) and directly from Latin publicationem (nominative publicatio) "a making public; an adjudging to the public treasury," noun of action from past-participle stem of publicare "make public," from publicus (see public (adj.)).

The meaning "the issuing of a written or printed work to the public by sale or distribution" is recorded by 1570s; as the word for the thing so issued and offered, from 1650s. Compare publicization. Parallel publishment existed alongside this word.

Related entries & more 
tariff (n.)

1590s, "arithmetical table," also "official list of customs duties on imports or exports; law regulating import duties," from Italian tariffa "tariff, price, assessment," Medieval Latin tarifa "list of prices, book of rates," from Arabic ta'rif "information, notification, a making known; inventory of fees to be paid," verbal noun from arafa "he made known, he taught." Sense of "classified list of charges made in a business" is recorded from 1757. The U.S. Tariff of Abominations was passed in 1828.

Related entries & more 
publicity (n.)

1791, "state or condition of being public or open to the observation and inquiry of a community," from French publicité (1690s), from Medieval Latin publicitatem (nominative publicitas), from Latin publicus (see public (adj.)). Sense of "a making (something) known, an exposure to the public" is from 1826, shading by c. 1900 into "advertising, the business of promotion." Publicity stunt is recorded by 1908.

Related entries & more 
beautification (n.)

"act of making beautiful," 1630s, from beauty + -fication "a making or causing."

Related entries & more