Etymology
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Magellanic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to Portuguese navigator Fernão de Magalhães (c. 1470-1521), the first European to round the tip of South America, whose surname was Englished as Magellan

The Magellanic Clouds, the two cloud-like patches of stars in the southern heavens, are attested under that name by 1680s. Magellan described them c. 1520, hence the name in Europe; but at least the larger of the two had been mentioned in 1515 by Peter Martyr d'Anghiera, chronicler of explorations in Central and South America.

In English they were earlier the Cape Clouds, because they became prominent as sailors rounding Africa neared the Cape of Good Hope; "but after Magellan became noted and fully described them they took and have retained his name." [Richard Hinckley Allen, "Star Names and Their Meanings," 1899]

Coompasinge abowte the poynt thereof, they myght see throughowte al the heaven about the same, certeyne shynynge whyte cloudes here and there amonge the starres, like unto theym whiche are scene in the tracte of heaven cauled Lactea via, that is the mylke whyte waye. [Richard Eden, translation of "Decades of the New World," 1555]
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cumulous (adj.)

in reference to clouds, "of the nature of cumulus clouds," 1815, see cumulo- + -ous.

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overcast (adj.)

c. 1300, of weather, "covered or overspread with clouds," past-participle adjective from verb overcast (early 13c.), "to place something over or across," also "to cover, to overspread" as with a garment, but usually of clouds, darkness (also "to knock down"), from over- + cast (v.).

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cloudless (adj.)

"without clouds, unobscured," 1590s, from cloud (n.) + -less. Related: Cloudlessly; cloudlessness.

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cloudy (adj.)

Old English cludig "rocky, hilly, full of cliffs;" see cloud (n.). Meaning "of the nature of atmospheric clouds" is recorded from c. 1300; meaning "full of clouds, overcast" is late 14c.; of liquids, etc., "not transparent, not clear," from 1580s. Figurative sense of "gloomy" is late 14c. Related: Cloudiness; cloudily.

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becloud (v.)
1590s, "cover with clouds," from be- + cloud. Figurative sense of "to obscure" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Beclouded; beclouding.
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mid-air (n.)

also midair, "the part of the air between the clouds and the air near the ground," from mid (adj.) + air (n.1).

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cirrocumulus (n.)

also cirro-cumulus, type of cloud having the characteristics of both cirrus and cumulus clouds, 1803, from combining form of cirrus + cumulus.

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dust-storm (n.)

"windstorm which raises clouds of dust into the air in a desert," by 1838, from dust (n.) + storm (n.).

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fleecy (adj.)
1560s, "wooly," from fleece (n.) + -y (2). From 1630s as "resembling fleece" in any sense (originally by Milton, of clouds).
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