Etymology
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Lutheran 
1520s, adjective and noun, "of or pertaining to Martin Luther or to the sect he founded, which has his name, or its doctrines," from name of German religious reformer Martin Luther (1483-1546). Luther called it the Evangelical Church. Used by Catholics 16c. in reference to all Protestants, regardless of sect. In 16c. Lutherian also was used. Related: Lutheranism (1560s).
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ministerium (n.)

"ordained ministers of a (Lutheran) church district," 1818, from Latin ministerium (see ministry).

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consubstantiation (n.)

"doctrine that the body and blood of Christ coeist in and with the elements of the Eucharist," 1590s, from Church Latin consubstantionem (nominative consubstantio), noun of action from past participle stem of consubstantiare, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + substantia "being, essence, material" (see substance). Opposed to the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation. Related: Consubstantiate.

The term consubstantiation was employed in the doctrinal controversies of the Reformation by non-Lutheran writers, to designate the Lutheran view of the Saviour's presence in the Holy Supper. The Lutheran Church, however, has never used or accepted this term to express her view, but has always and repeatedly rejected it, and the meaning it conveys, in her official declarations. [Century Dictionary]
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ubiquity (n.)
"omnipresence," 1570s, from Modern Latin ubiquitas, from Latin ubique "everywhere," from ubi "where" (see ubi) + que "any, also, and, ever," as a suffix giving universal meaning to the word it is attached to, from PIE root *kwe "and." Originally a Lutheran theological position maintaining the omnipresence of Christ.
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Pietism (n.)

1690s, in reference to a specific religious movement, Pietism, from German Pietismus, originally applied in derision to the movement to revive personal piety in the Lutheran Church, begun in Frankfurt c. 1670 by Philipp Jakob Spener (1635-1705). See piety + -ism. With lower-case p- and in reference generally to devotion, godliness of life (as distinguished from mere intellectual orthodoxy), by 1829.

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reform (v.)

late 14c., reformen, "to convert into or restore to another and better form" (of strength, health, firmness, etc.), from Old French reformer "rebuild, reconstruct, recreate" (12c.) and directly from Latin reformare "to form again, change, transform, alter," from re- "again" (see re-) + formare "to form" (see form (n.)).

The meaning "change (someone or something) for the better, correct, improve; bring (someone) away from an evil course of life" is recorded from late 14c.; of governments, institutions, etc., from early 15c. Intransitive sense of "abandon wrongdoing or error" is by 1580s. Related: Reformed; reforming. Reformed churches (1580s) on the European continent were usually Calvinist as opposed to Lutheran (in France they were the Huguenots). Reformed Judaism (1843) is a movement initiated in Germany by Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786). Reform school is attested from 1859.

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Bronx 

borough of New York City, named for Jonas Bronck, who settled there in 1641.

Jonas Bronck, who arrived at New Amsterdam in 1639, and whose name is perpetuated in Bronx Borough, Bronx Park, Bronxville — in New York — was a Scandinavian, in all probability a Dane and originally, as it seems, from Thorshavn, Faroe Islands, where his father was a pastor in the Lutheran Church. Faroe then belonged to Denmark-Norway and had been settled by Norwegians. The official language of the island in Bronck's days was Danish. ... Bronck may have been a Swede if we judge by the name alone for the name of Brunke is well known in Sweden. [John Oluf Evjen, "Scandinavian immigrants in New York, 1630-1674," Minneapolis, 1916]

The derisive Bronx cheer ("made by blowing through closed lips, usually with the tongue between" - OED) is attested by 1929.

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