Etymology
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lord (n.)
Origin and meaning of lord

mid-13c., laverd, loverd, from Old English hlaford "master of a household, ruler, feudal lord, superior; husband," also "God," translating Latin dominus, Greek kyrios in the New Testament, Hebrew yahweh in the Old (though Old English dryhten was more frequent). Old English hlaford is a contraction of earlier hlafweard, literally "one who guards the loaves," from hlaf "bread, loaf" (see loaf (n.)) + weard "keeper, guardian" (from PIE root *wer- (3) "perceive, watch out for").

Compare lady (literally "bread-kneader"), and Old English hlafæta "household servant," literally "loaf-eater." For the contraction, compare Harold. The modern monosyllabic form emerged 14c. Meaning "an owner of land, houses, etc.," is from c. 1300; the sense in landlord. As the "usual polite or respectful form of address to a nobleman under the rank of a duke, and to a bishop" [OED] from 1540s. As an interjection from late 14c. Lords "peers of England," especially as represented in parliaments, is from mid-15c.

Lord's Prayer is from 1540s. Year of our Lord is from late 14c. (translating Latin anno domini) in reference to the incarnation of God in Christ. Lord knows (who, what, why, etc.), expressing a state of ignorance, is from 1711. Lord of the Flies (1907) translates Beelzebub (q.v.); William Golding's book was published in 1954. To drink like a lord is from 1620s.

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lord (v.)
Origin and meaning of lord
c. 1300, "to exercise lordship, rule as a lord," from lord (n.). Intransitive meaning "to play the lord, domineer" is late 14c. Related: Lorded; lording. To lord it is from 1570s.
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lordy (interj.)
1832, in imitation of African-American vernacular; extended form of Lord (n.) as an interjection.
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lordling (n.)
"puny or contemptible lord," late 13c., from lord (n.) + -ling.
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warlord (n.)
also war-lord, 1856, from war (n.) + lord (n.). Often a translation of German Kriegsherr or Chinese junfa.
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landlord (n.)
early 15c. (late 13c. as a surname), "owner of a tenement, one who rents land or property to a tenant," from land (n.) + lord (n.).
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laird (n.)
"landed proprietor or hereditary estate-holder in Scotland," mid-15c. (mid-13c. as a surname), Scottish and northern England dialectal variant of lord, from Middle English laverd (see lord (n.)). Related: Lairdship.
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lordly (adj.)
late 14c., "haughty, imperious," from Old English hlafordlic "of or pertaining to lords, noble;" see lord (n.) + -ly (1). From 1530s as "magnificent, on a grand scale, fit for a lord." As an adverb, "despotically," from mid-14c.
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lordship (n.)
c. 1300, from Old English hlafordscipe "authority, rule, dominion" (translating Latin dominatio); see lord (n.) + -ship. As a form of address to nobles, judges, etc., from late 15c.
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breadwinner (n.)
also bread-winner, "one who supplies a living for himself and others," especially a family, 1821, from the noun bread (probably in a literal sense) + winner, from win (v.) in its sense of "struggle for, work at." Attested slightly earlier (1818) in sense "skill or art by which one makes a living." Not too far removed from the image at the root of lord (n.).
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