Etymology
Advertisement
loop (n.)
late 14c., "a fold or doubling of cloth, rope, leather, cord, etc.," of uncertain origin. OED favors a Celtic origin (compare Gaelic lub "bend," Irish lubiam), which in English was perhaps influenced by or blended with Old Norse hlaup "a leap, run" (see leap (v.)). As a feature of a fingerprint, 1880. In reference to magnetic recording tape or film, first recorded 1931. Computer programming sense "sequence of instructions executed repeatedly" first attested 1947.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
loop (v.)

c. 1400, loupen, "to draw (a leash through a ring)," from loop (n.). Sense of "form into a loop or loops" (transitive) is from 1832; transitive meaning "form (something) into loops" is from 1856. Related: Looped (1934 in the slang sense "drunk"); looping. Loop the loop (1900) originally was in reference to roller-coasters at amusement parks.

"Loop-the-Loop" is the name of a new entertainment which goes further in the way of tempting Providence than anything yet invented. The "Loop" is an immense circle of track in the air. A car on a mimic railway shoots down a very steep incline, and is impelled around the inner side of this loop. ... The authorities at Coney Island are said to have prohibited "looping-the-loop" because women break their corset strings in their efforts to catch their breath as they sweep down the incline, and moreover, a young man is reported to have ruptured a blood vessel in his liver. ["Philadelphia Medical Journal," Aug. 10, 1901]
Related entries & more 
loopy (adj.)
1856, "full of loops," from loop (n.) + -y (2). Slang sense "crazy" is attested from 1923. The earlier figurative sense was "crafty, deceitful" (1824), popularized by Scott's novels.
Related entries & more 
slipknot (n.)
also slip-knot, 1650s, from slip (v.) + knot (n.). One which easily can be "slipped" or undone by pulling on the loose end of the last loop.
Related entries & more 
frog (n.2)

type of fastening for clothing, 1719, originally a belt loop for carrying a weapon, of unknown origin; perhaps from Portuguese froco, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool," a word of unknown etymology.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ankh (n.)
tau cross with an oval loop at the top, Egyptian symbol of life, 1873, from Egyptian ankh, literally "life, soul." Also known as crux ansata.
Related entries & more 
hank (n.)
late 13c., "a loop of rope" (in nautical use), probably from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse hönk "a hank, coil," hanki "a clasp (of a chest);" ultimately related to hang (v.). From 1550s as a length of yarn or thread.
Related entries & more 
terry (n.)
"loop raised in pile-weaving, left uncut," 1784, of uncertain origin, possibly an alteration of French tiré "drawn," from past participle of tirer "draw out" (compare German gezogener Sammet "drawn velvet").
Related entries & more 
noose (n.)

"loop formed by fastening a running knot or slip-knot," mid-15c., perhaps from Old French nos or cognate Old Provençal nous "knot," from Latin nodus "knot" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie"). Rare before c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
strop (n.)
mid-14c., "loop or strap on a harness," probably from Old French estrop, making it the older and more correct form of strap (n.), replaced by it from 16c. Specific sense of "leather strap used for sharpening razors" first recorded 1702. The verb in this sense is from 1841. Related: Stropped; stropping. Distribution of senses between strap and strop is arbitrary.
Related entries & more