Etymology
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error (n.)

also, through 18c., errour; c. 1300, "a deviation from truth made through ignorance or inadvertence, a mistake," also "offense against morality or justice; transgression, wrong-doing, sin;" from Old French error "mistake, flaw, defect, heresy," from Latin errorem (nominative error) "a wandering, straying, a going astray; meandering; doubt, uncertainty;" also "a figurative going astray, mistake," from errare "to wander; to err" (see err). From early 14c. as "state of believing or practicing what is false or heretical; false opinion or belief, heresy." From late 14c. as "deviation from what is normal; abnormality, aberration." From 1726 as "difference between observed value and true value."

Words for "error" in most Indo-European languages originally meant "wander, go astray" (for example Greek plane in the New Testament, Old Norse villa, Lithuanian klaida, Sanskrit bhrama-), but Irish has dearmad "error," from dermat "a forgetting."

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literal (adj.)

late 14c., "taking words in their natural meaning" (originally in reference to Scripture and opposed to mystical or allegorical), from Late Latin literalis/litteralis "of or belonging to letters or writing," from Latin litera/littera "letter, alphabetic sign; literature, books" (see letter (n.1)). Related: Literalness.

Meaning "of or pertaining to alphabetic letters" is from late 14c. Meaning "concerned with letters and learning, learned, scholarly" is from mid-15c. Sense of "verbally exact, according to the letter of verbal expression" is attested from 1590s, as is application to the primary sense of a word or passage. Literal-minded is attested from 1791.

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misprint (v.)

"make an error in printing (something)," late 15c.; from mis- (1) + print (v.). Related: misprinted; misprinting. The noun, "an error made in printing," is attested by 1745.

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heterodoxy (n.)

1650s, from Greek heterodoxia "error of opinion," from heterodoxos (see heterodox).

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mistake (v.)

mid-14c., "to commit an offense;" late 14c., "to misunderstand, misinterpret, take in a wrong sense," from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + take (v.) or from a cognate Scandinavian source such as Old Norse mistaka "take in error, miscarry." Perhaps a blend of both words. The more literal sense of "take or choose erroneously" is from late 14c. Meaning "err in advice, opinion, or judgment" is from 1580s. Related: Mistook; mistaking.

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expediate (v.)

a 17c. error for expedite that has gotten into the dictionaries.

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despatch 

18c. variant of dispatch (q.v.), apparently the result of an error in the printing of Johnson's dictionary.

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shrewdish (adj.)

"somewhat shrewd," by 1807; see shrewd + -ish. In some cases perhaps an error for shrewish.

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literality (n.)

"quality of being literal; literal meaning," 1640s; see literal + -ity.

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