Etymology
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ecstasy (n.)
Origin and meaning of ecstasy

late 14c., extasie "elation," from Old French estaise "ecstasy, rapture," from Late Latin extasis, from Greek ekstasis "entrancement, astonishment, insanity; any displacement or removal from the proper place," in New Testament "a trance," from existanai "displace, put out of place," also "drive out of one's mind" (existanai phrenon), from ek "out" (see ex-) + histanai "to place, cause to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Used by 17c. mystical writers for "a state of rapture that stupefied the body while the soul contemplated divine things," which probably helped the meaning shift to "exalted state of good feeling" (1610s). Slang use for the drug 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine dates from 1985. Formerly also spelled ecstasie, extacy, extasy, etc. Attempts to coin a verb to go with it include ecstasy (1620s), ecstatize (1650s), ecstasiate (1823), ecstasize (1830).

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liquid (adj.)

late 14c., "flowing, capable of flowing; neither solid nor gaseous," from Old French liquide "liquid, running" (13c.), from Latin liquidus "fluid, liquid, moist," figuratively "flowing, continuing," also of sounds and voices, from liquere "be fluid," related to liqui "to melt, flow," from PIE *wleik- "to flow, run."

In English, of sounds from 1630s. Financial sense of "capable of being converted to cash" is first recorded 1818, from earlier use in Scots Law (17c.) in reference to debts that had been proved (in court, etc.).

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liquid (n.)

"a liquid substance," 1708, from liquid (adj.). Earlier it meant "sound of a liquid consonant" (1520s), following Latin liquidae, Greek hygra, applied to letters of an easy, "flowing" sound.

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enrapt (adj.)

c. 1600, "carried away by (prophetic) ecstasy," from en- "make, put in" (see en- (1)) + rapt.

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ec- 

typical form before consonants of Latin ex- or Greek ex-/ek- (see ex-), as in eclipse, ecstasy).

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liquescent (adj.)

"having a tendency to become liquid," 1727, from Latin liquescentem (nominative liquescens), present participle of liquescere "to melt," from liquere "to be liquid" (see liquid (adj.)) Related: Liquescency (1650s).

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ravishing (adj.)

mid-14c., "ravenous;" late 14c., "enchanting, exciting rapture or ecstasy;" present-participle adjective from ravish (v.). The figurative notion is of "carrying off from earth to heaven." Related: Ravishingly.

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liquidize (v.)

1837, "make liquid," from liquid (adj.) + -ize. Meaning "to run through a kitchen liquidizer" is from 1954. Related: Liquidized; liquidizing.

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liquidity (n.)

1610s, "quality of being liquid," from Late Latin liquiditatem (nominative liquiditas) "liquidity," from Latin liquidus (see liquid (adj.)). Meaning "quality of being financially liquid" is from 1897. Earlier in the literal sense was liquidness (1520s).

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LCD 

1973, initialism (acronym) from liquid crystal display, which is attested from 1968, from liquid crystal, a translation of German flüssiger krystall (1890).

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