Etymology
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medication (n.)

early 15c., medicacioun, "medical treatment of a disease or wound," from Old French médication and directly from Latin medicationem (nominative medicatio) "healing, cure," noun of action from past-participle stem of medicare, medicari "to medicate, heal, cure" (poetic and Late Latin) from medicus "physician; healing" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). Meaning "a medicinal substance or product" is by 1942.

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lipid (n.)
"organic substance of the fat group," 1925, from French lipide, coined 1923 by G. Bertrand from Greek lipos "fat, grease" (see lipo-) + chemical suffix -ide.
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scowl (n.)

"a lowering or wrinkling of the brows, as in anger or displeasure; a malevolent, lowering look," c. 1500, from scowl (v.).

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abasement (n.)
early 15c., "embarrassment, dread, fear," from abase + -ment. Sense of "action of lowering in price" is mid-15c.; "action of lowering in rank" is 1560s; "condition of being abased" is from 1610s.
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self-depreciation (n.)

"a lowering of the value of oneself," 1827; see self- + depreciation. Related: Self-depreciating.

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Ambien 
trade name for prescription medication Zolpidem, which is used to treat insomnia, registered 1993 in U.S., no doubt suggested by ambient or words like it in French.
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curtsy (n.)
1540s, "expression of respect," a variant of courtesy (q.v.). Specific meaning "a bending the knee and lowering the body as a gesture of respect" is from 1570s. Originally not exclusively feminine.
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dosage (n.)

1867 in chemistry; 1874 in medicine, "act or practice of administering medication in doses," especially in reference to the size; see dose + -age, perhaps on model of French dosage (1812).

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settling (n.)

c. 1400, "act of sinking down, lowering," verbal noun from settle (v.).

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depressing (adj.)

"having the quality of lowering the spirits, dispiriting," 1789, present-participle adjective from depress (v.). Related: Depressingly.

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