Etymology
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ling (n.)

long, slender European fish, c. 1300, lenge, common Germanic, cognate with Dutch leng, German Leng, Old Norse langa, probably ultimately related to long (adj.) and so named for its length.

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lordling (n.)

"puny or contemptible lord," late 13c., from lord (n.) + -ling.

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hireling (n.)

"one who works for hire," Old English hyrling; see hire (v.) + -ling. Now only disparaging, "one who acts only for mercenary motives," a sense that emerged late 16c. As an adjective by 1580s.

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loneling (n.)

"single child" (as opposed to a twin, etc.), 1570s, from lone (adj.) + -ling.

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catling (n.)

"small cat, kitten," 1620s, from cat (n.) + diminutive suffix -ling.

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halfling (n.)

"one not fully grown," 1794, from half + -ling.

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hatchling (n.)

"newly hatched creature," 1854, from hatch (v.1) + diminutive suffix -ling.

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fatling (n.)

"lamb, kid, or other young animal fattened for slaughter," 1520s, from fat (n.) + -ling.

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