Etymology
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limit (v.)
late 14c., "set limits to, restrict within limits" (also "prescribe, fix, assign"), from Old French limiter "mark (a boundary), restrict; specify" (14c.), from Latin limitare "to bound, limit, fix," from limes "boundary, limit" (see limit (n.)). From early 15c. as "delimit, appoint or specify a limit." Related: limited; limiting; limitable.
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limit (n.)

c. 1400, "boundary, frontier," from Old French limite "a boundary," from Latin limitem (nominative limes) "a boundary, limit, border, embankment between fields," which is probably related to limen "threshold," and possibly from the base of limus "transverse, oblique," which is of uncertain origin. Originally of territory; general sense from early 15c. Colloquial sense of "the very extreme, the greatest degree imaginable" is from 1904.

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limitless (adj.)
1580s, from limit (n.) + -less. Related: Limitlessly; limitlessness.
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unlimited (adj.)
mid-15c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of limit (v.).
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illimitable (adj.)

1590s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not" + limitable (see limit (v.)).

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liminal (adj.)
"of or pertaining to a threshold," 1870, from Latin limen "threshold, cross-piece, sill" (see limit (n.)) + -al (1). Related: Liminality.
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off-limits (adj.)

"forbidden, outside the limits within which a particular group or person must remain," by 1881, U.S. military academies jargon, from off (prep.) + limit (n.). Earlier (1857) it was applied to cadets, etc., who were in violation of the limitations on their movement and behavior.

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limitary (adj.)
1610s, from Latin limitaris, from limes (genitive limitis) "boundary, limit" (see limit (n.)). Other adjectives in English included limital (1877), limitaneous (1721), limitative (1520s). Related: Limitarian.
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delimit (v.)

"to mark or fix the boundaries of," 1852, from French délimiter (18c.), from Late Latin delimitare "to mark out as a boundary," from de (see de-) + limitare, from limitem, limes "boundary, limit" (see limit (n.)). Related: Delimited; delimiting.

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limitation (n.)

late 14c., from Old French limitacion "restriction, legal limitation," and directly from Latin limitationem (nominative limitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of limitare "to bound, limit, fix," from limes "boundary, limit" (see limit (n.)). Phrase statute of limitations is attested by 1768; it fixes and limits the period within which an action must be brought.

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