Etymology
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Lewis 
masc. proper name, Anglo-French form of French Louis (see Louis).
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bandersnatch (n.)
"fabulous, dangerous creature," 1871 ("Jabberwocky"), coined by Lewis Carroll.
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vorpal (adj.)

1871, invented by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking-Glass" ("Jabberwocky").

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snark (n.)

imaginary animal, coined 1876 by Lewis Carroll in "The Hunting of the Snark." In 1950s, name of a type of U.S. cruise missile, and in 1980s, of a type of sailboat. Meaning "caustic, opinionated, and critical rhetoric" is from c. 2002, probably from snarky and not directly related, if at all, to Lewis Carroll's use of snark.

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chortle (v.)

coined 1871 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," perhaps from chuckle and snort. Related: Chortled; chortling. As a noun, from 1903.

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frumious (adj.)
1871 ("Jabberwocky"), coined by Lewis Carroll, who said it was a blend of fuming and furious. He used it later in "The Hunting of the Snark" (1876).
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manxome 

1871, a word invented by Lewis Carroll ("Jabberwocky"). Anyone's guess what he meant by it.

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beamish (adj.)

1530 (beamysshe, in John Palsgrave's "L'éclaircissement de la langue française"), from beam + -ish. Lewis Carroll may have thought he was inventing it in "Jabberwocky" (1871).

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Harris 
surname, attested from c. 1400 (Harrys), from "Harry," the popular pronunciation of Henry. As a type of tweed (1892), it is from the name of the southern section of the island of Lewis with Harris in the Outer Hebrides; originally it referred to fabric produced by the inhabitants there, later a proprietary name. That place name represents Gaelic na-h-earaidh "that which is higher," in comparison to the lower Lewis. Harrisburg, capital of Pennsylvania, is named for ferryman John Harris (1727-1791), son of the original European settler.
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mome (n.)

"buffoon, fool, stupid person," 1550s, from Old French mome "a mask. Related" Momish. The adjective introduced by "Lewis Carroll" is an unrelated nonsense word.

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