Etymology
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laying (n.)
early 14c., verbal noun from lay (v.).
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deck (v.2)

"to knock down," by 1955, probably from deck (n.) on the notion of laying someone out on a ship's deck. Compare floor (v.) "to knock down." Related: Decked; decking.

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bonding (n.)
"a binding or connecting together," 1670s, originally in the laying of bricks, stones, etc.; verbal noun from bond (v.)). Male bonding is attested by 1969.
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macadamization (n.)

"process of laying roads according to the system of John L. McAdam;" 1824, noun of action from macadamize (see macadam).

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devastating (adj.)

1630s, "laying waste, ravaging," present-participle adjective from devastate. Trivial or hyperbolic use is by 1889.

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re-lay (v.)

"to lay again, lay a second time" 1580s, from re- "back, again" + lay (v.). With hyphenated spelling and full pronunciation of the prefix to distinguish it from relay. Related: Re-laid; re-laying.

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outlay (n.)

"act or fact of laying out (especially money) or expending; that which is laid out or expended," 1798, originally Scottish, from out- + lay (v.).

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reposition (n.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), reposicioun, in medicine, "a placing, putting, act of replacing, operation of restoring (something) to its original position," from Late Latin repositionem (nominative repositio) "a laying up, a storing up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin reponere (see repose (v.2)). Meaning "act of laying up in safety" is from 1610s; that of "reinstatement" (of a person, to an office, etc.)
is from 1640s.

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vorlage (n.)
"skiing," 1939, from German vorlage, from vorlegen "to lean forward," from vor (see fore) + legen, from Old High German laga "act of laying," from Proto-Germanic *lagam, from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay."
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execration (n.)

late 14c., "cursing, act of laying under a curse," from Latin execrationem (nominative execratio) "malediction, curse," noun of action from past-participle stem of execrari "to hate, curse," from ex "out" (see ex-) + sacrare "to devote to holiness or to destruction, consecrate," from sacer "sacred" (see sacred). From 1560s as "an uttered curse."

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