Etymology
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layer (v.)
1832, in gardening, as a method of plant propagation, from layer (n.). Meaning "to form into layers" is from 1852. Related: Layered; layering.
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layer (n.)
late 14c., "one who or that lays" (especially stones, "a mason"), agent noun from lay (v.). Passive sense of "a thickness of some material laid over a surface" is first recorded 1610s, but because the earliest English use was in cookery this is perhaps from French liue "binding," used of a thickened sauce. Of hens from 1707. Layer cake attested from 1875.
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bricklayer (n.)
also brick-layer, "one who builds with bricks," late 15c., from brick (n.) + layer in the original sense. Related: Bricklaying.
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multilayer (adj.)

also multi-layer, "composed of or occurring in many layers," 1907, from multi- "many" + layer (n.). Related: Multi-layered (1895).

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lair (n.)
Old English leger "act or place of lying down; bed, couch; illness; the grave," from Proto-Germanic *legraz (source also of Old Norse legr "the grave," also "nuptials" (both "a lying down"); Old Frisian leger "situation," Old Saxon legar "bed," Middle Dutch legher "act or place of lying down," Dutch leger "bed, camp," Old High German legar "bed, a lying down," German Lager "bed, lair, camp, storehouse," Gothic ligrs "place of lying"), from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay." Meaning "animal's den" is from early 15c. Essentially the same word as layer (n.), but more ancient and differentiated in sense.
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primer (n.3)

"first layer of dye or paint," 1680s, agent noun from prime (v.).

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coating (n.)

"a layer of some substance spread over a surface," 1768, verbal noun from coat (v.).

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laminate (n.)
"artificial thin layer," 1939, especially a type of plastic adhesive; see laminate (v.).
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multi-ply (adj.)

"having several layers or webs," 1887, from multi- "many" + ply (n.) "a layer, a fold."

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overstuffed (adj.)

also over-stuffed, of furniture, "completely covered with a thick layer of stuffing," 1883, from over- + past participle of stuff (v.).

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