Etymology
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lashing (n.)
"a beating, flogging," c. 1400, verbal noun from lash (v.1).
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lash (v.1)
c. 1300, "to deal a blow;" later "to strike with a whip, beat with a lash" (late 14c.), possibly imitative. To lash out "to strike out violently" (originally of horses) is from 1560s and preserves the older sense. Related: Lashed; lashing.
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tongue-lash (v.)
"scold, abuse with words," 1857, from tongue (n.) + lash (v.). Related: Tongue-lashing.
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lash (v.2)

"to tie or bind," as with rope or cord, 1620s, originally nautical, from French lachier, from Old French lacier "to lace on, fasten with laces; entrap, ensnare" (see lace (v.)). Related: Lashed; lashing.

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lambada (n.)
type of sensual Brazilian dance, 1988, from Portuguese, said in some sources to mean literally "a beating, a lashing." But others [Watkins] connect it ultimately to Latin lumbus "loin" (see lumbo-).
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bulldoze (v.)
by 1880, "intimidate by violence," from an earlier noun, bulldose "a severe beating or lashing" (1876), said by contemporary sources to be literally "a dose fit for a bull," a slang word referring to the intimidation beating of black voters (by either blacks or whites) in the chaotic 1876 U.S. presidential election. See bull (n.1) + dose (n.). The bull element in it seems to be connected to that in bull-whip and might be directly from that word. Meaning "use a mechanical ground-clearing caterpillar tractor" is from 1942 (see bulldozer); figurative use in this sense is by 1948. Related: Bulldozed; bulldozing.
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