Etymology
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Laertes 
king of Ithaca, father of Odysseus, his name is Greek, literally "gatherer of the people," or "urging the men," from laos "people" (see lay (adj.)) + eirein "to fasten together" (see series (n.)) or eirein "to speak, say" (see verb).
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Odysseus 

king of Ithaca at the time of the Trojan War, son of Laertes and Anticleia, from Greek Odysseus, a name of unknown origin. Epic poets connected it with odyssasthai "to be angry, be grieved, grumble," but this now is regarded as folk-etymology. Beekes writes that "the name is typically Pre-Greek ... on account of the many variants." Among them are several by-forms with -l-: Olysseus, Olytteus, Oulixeus, etc., hence Latin Ulysses,Ulixes.

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