Etymology
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led 
past tense and past participle of lead (v.). As an adjective, often with the implication of subjection or sycophancy.
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LED (n.)
1968, initialism (acronym) from light-emitting diode.
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lassitude (n.)

early 15c., from Latin lassitudinem (nominative lassitudo) "faintness, weariness," from lassus "faint, tired, weary," from PIE *led-to-, suffixed form of *led- "slow, weary" (source also of Old English læt "sluggish, slow;" see late (adj.)), from PIE root *‌‌lē- "to let go, slacken."

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ductile (adj.)

mid-14c., "hammered, beaten out or shaped with a hammer," from Old French ductile or directly from Latin ductilis "that may be led or drawn," from past participle of ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). From 1560s as "flexible, pliable;" 1620s as "capable of being drawn out in wires or threads." Of persons, "capable of being led or drawn," 1620s. Related: Ductility.

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het (adj.)
"heated," archaic, late 14c., from variant past participle of heat (v.). Compare lead (v.)/led, etc.
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Locarno 
place in Switzerland; a 1925 conference held there between Germany and other European powers led to treaties for the preservation of peace and the security of borders.
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destrier (n.)

also destrer, "riding horse of a noble breed, war horse," c. 1300, from Old French destrer, destrier (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *dextrarius "led by the right hand," from Latin dextra, fem. of dexter "right (hand)" (from PIE root *deks- "right; south"). So called because it was led at the right hand until wanted in battle. The spelling destrer was usual in Middle English; destrier was used later, in deliberately archaic or historic contexts.

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Bering 

strait and sea between Alaska and Siberia, named for Danish explorer Vitus Bering, who worked for Peter the Great and led the first European expedition to sight Alaska, in 1741.

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jollification (n.)
"mirth, scene or occasion of merrymaking," 1769, from jolly + -fication "a making or causing." Shortened form jolly (1905) led to phrase get (one's) jollies "have fun" (1957). Spenser has jolliment (1590).
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brooch (n.)
"ornamental clasp consisting of a pin and a covering shield," early 13c., from Old French broche "long needle" (see broach (n.)). Specialized meaning led 14c. to distinct spelling.
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