Etymology
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kinesis (n.)

"physical movement, muscular action," 1819, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion").

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psychokinesis (n.)

"the supposed psychic power of moving objects by other than physical means," 1904, from psycho- + kinesis. Related: Psychokinetic (1904).

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*keie- 

also keiə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to set in motion."

It might form all or part of: behest; cinema; cinematography; citation; cite; excite; hest; hight; hyperkinetic; incite; kinase; kinematics; kinesics; kinesiology; kinesis; kinesthesia; kinesthetic; kinetic; kineto-; kino-; oscitant; recital; recitation; recite; resuscitate; solicit; solicitous; suscitate; telekinesis.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit cyavate "stirs himself, goes;" Greek kinein "to move, set in motion; change, stir up," kinymai "move myself;" Latin ciere (past participle citus, frequentative citare) "to set in motion, summon;" Gothic haitan "call, be called;" Old English hatan "command, call."  

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kinesiology (n.)

1894, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ology. Related: Kinesiological; kinesiologically.

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kinesics (n.)

study of body language, 1952, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ics. Related: kinesic.

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brady- 

medical word-forming element meaning "slow, delayed, tardy," from Greek bradys "slow;" as in bradycardia (1890), with Latinized form of Greek kardia "heart;" bradykinesia, "slow movement," with Greek kinēsis "movement, motion;" bradypnea, with Greek pneo/pnein "to breathe."

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kinematics (n.)

"the science of motion," 1840, from French cinématique (Ampère, 1834), from Latinized form of Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion"). Related: Kinematic (adj.), 1846; kinematical; kinematically.

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telekinesis (n.)

1890, said in early references to have been coined by Alexander N. Aksakof (1832-1903) Imperial Councilor to the Czar, in Modern Latin, literally "motion at a distance," from tele- + Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion." Translates German Fernwirkung. Related: Telekinetic.

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