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Kent 
southeasternmost county of England, Old English Cent, Cent lond, Centrice, from Latin Cantia, Canticum (Caesar), Greek Kantion (Strabo, 51 B.C.E.), from an ancient British Celtic name often explained as "coastal district," or "corner-land, land on the edge," but possibly "land of the hosts or armies." Related: Kentish (Old English Centisc).
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Canterbury 
Old English Cantware-buruh "fortified town of the Kentish people," from Cant-ware "the people of Kent" (see Kent). The Roman name was Duroverno, from Romano-British *duro- "walled town."

Pope Gregory the Great intended to make London, as the largest southern Anglo-Saxon city, the metropolitan see of southern England, but Christianity got a foothold first in the minor kingdom of Kent, whose heathen ruler Ethelbert had married a Frankish Christian princess. London was in the Kingdom of Essex and out of reach of the missionaries at first. Therefore, in part perhaps to flatter Ethelbert, his capital was made the cathedral city. Related: Canterburian. The shrine of Thomas à Becket, murdered there 1170, was a favorite pilgrimage destination.
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kendal (n.)
green woolen cloth, late 14c., from place name in Westmoreland where it was manufactured. The place (which is in the Domesday Book) is "Kent-dale," so called for being in the dale of the River Kent.
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Dover 

port in Kent, Old English Dofras (c. 700), from Latin Dubris (4c.), from British Celtic *Dubras "the waters." Named for the stream that flows nearby.

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weald (n.)
Old English (West Saxon) weald "forest, woodland," specifically the forest between the North and South Downs in Sussex, Kent, and Surrey; a West Saxon variant of Anglian wald (see wold). Related: Wealden.
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Jute 
Old English Eotas, Iutas (plural), one of the ancient Germanic inhabitants of Jutland, the peninsula between modern Germany and Denmark, who, with the Angles and Saxons invaded Britain in 5c.. Traditionally they were said to have settled in Kent and Hampshire. The name is related to Old Norse Iotar. Related: Jutish (1775).
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brook (n.)
"small natural stream," Old English broc "flowing stream, torrent," of obscure origin, probably from Proto-Germanic *broka- which yielded words in German (Bruch) and Dutch (broek) that have a sense of "marsh, bog." In Sussex and Kent, it means "water-meadow," and in plural, "low, marshy ground."
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amniocentesis (n.)
name of a diagnostic technique involving the withdrawing of amniotic fluid by hypodermic needle, 1958, Modern Latin, from amnion + centesis "surgical puncture involving a puncture," from Latinized form of Greek kentesis "a pricking," from kentein "to prick," from PIE root *kent- "to prick, jab" (see center (n.)).
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cestus (n.1)

"a girdle," a belt worn around the waist in ancient Greece, 1570s, from Latinized form of Greek kestos, noun use of an adjective meaning "stitched, embroidered," from kentein "to prick," from PIE root *kent- "to prick, jab" (see center (n.)). Especially the magical love-inspiring girdle of Aphrodite/Venus.

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heptarchy (n.)
1570s, from Modern Latin heptarchia; see hepta- "seven" + -archy "rule." A group of seven kingdoms; especially in English history in reference to Anglo-Saxon times (Kent, Sussex, Wessex, Essex, Northumberland, East Anglia, Mercia). "The correctness and propriety of the designation have been often called in question, but its practical convenience has preserved it in use" [OED].
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