Etymology
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Jabberwocky 

1871, nonsense word (perhaps based on jabber) coined by Lewis Carroll, for the poem of the same name, which he published in "Through the Looking-Glass." The poem is about a fabulous beast called the Jabberwock.

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bandersnatch (n.)
"fabulous, dangerous creature," 1871 ("Jabberwocky"), coined by Lewis Carroll.
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vorpal (adj.)

1871, invented by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking-Glass" ("Jabberwocky").

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manxome 

1871, a word invented by Lewis Carroll ("Jabberwocky"). Anyone's guess what he meant by it.

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frumious (adj.)
1871 ("Jabberwocky"), coined by Lewis Carroll, who said it was a blend of fuming and furious. He used it later in "The Hunting of the Snark" (1876).
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beamish (adj.)

1530 (beamysshe, in John Palsgrave's "L'éclaircissement de la langue française"), from beam + -ish. Lewis Carroll may have thought he was inventing it in "Jabberwocky" (1871).

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galumph (v.)

"to prance about in a self-satisfied manner," 1871, coined by Lewis Carroll in "Jabberwocky," apparently by blending gallop and triumph. "The sense in current use may vary according to different notions of what the sound expresses" [OED]. Related: Galumphing.

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portmanteau (n.)

1580s, "flexible traveling case or bag for clothes and other necessaries," from Middle French portemanteau "traveling bag," originally "court official who carried a prince's mantle" (1540s), from porte, imperative of porter "to carry" (see porter (n.1)) + manteau "cloak" (see mantle (n.)). Sometimes partially Englished as portmantle.

Portmanteau word "word blending the sound of two different words" (1882) was coined by "Lewis Carroll" (Charles L. Dodgson, 1832-1898) for the sort of words he invented for "Jabberwocky," on the notion of "two meanings packed up into one word." As a noun in this sense from 1872.

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