Etymology
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Italian (n.)
early 15c., "native of Italy," from Italian Italiano, from Italia "Italy" (see Italy). Meaning "the Italian language" is late 14c. As an adjective from 1510s. Earlier the Italians were the Italies (late 14c.).
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Italianate (adj.)

1570s, from Italian Italianato "rendered Italian," from Italiano (see Italian). In older use "applied especially to fantastic affectations of fashions borrowed from Italy" [Century Dictionary], or in reference to the supposed Italian proverb that translates as an Englishman Italianate is a Devil incarnate which circulated in English (there also was a version in Germany about Italianized Germans).

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contessa (n.)

"an Italian countess," 1819, from Italian contessa, from Medieval Latin cometissa (see countess).

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lazzarone (n.)
"Italian beggar," 1792, Italian, augmentative of lazzaro "a beggar, leper," from Lazarus (q.v.).
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calzone (n.)

type of Italian stuffed turnover, a specialty of Naples, Italian, literally "trouser leg," so called for the resemblance.

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sambuca (n.)

Italian flavored liqueur, made from elderberries, that resembles French anisette, 1971, from Italian, from Latin sambucus "elder tree."

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citadel (n.)

"fortress commanding a city," 1580s, from French citadelle (15c.), from Italian cittadella, diminutive of Old Italian cittade "city" (Modern Italian citta), from Latin civitatem (nominative civitas; also source of Portuguese citadella, Spanish ciuadela; see city).

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ciabatta (n.)

type of Italian bread made with olive oil, c. 1990, from Italian ciabatta, literally "carpet slipper;" the bread so called for its shape; the Italian word is from the same source that produced French sabot, Spanish zapata (see sabotage (n.)). The bread itself is said to have been developed in the 1980s as an Italian version of the French baguette.

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Padua 
Italian city, Italian Padova, from Latin Patavium, probably from Gaulish *padi "pine," in reference to the pine forests thereabouts. Related: Paduan.
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