Etymology
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issuance (n.)

"act of issuing," 1823, American English, from issue (v.) + -ance.

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publishing (n.)

mid-15c., "act of announcing or declaring," also "the issuing of copies of a book for public sale," verbal noun from publish (v.).

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kite (v.)

in reference to writing a fictitious check, 1839, American English, from 1805 phrase fly a kite "raise money by issuing commercial paper on nonexistent funds;" see kite (n.). Related: Kited; kiting.

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outing (n.)

late 14c., "action of going out, an issuing forth;" mid-15c., "act of putting or driving out, expulsion, ejection;" verbal noun from out (v.). Original senses are now obsolete. The meaning "an excursion, a pleasure-trip" is from 1821.

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breakout (n.)

also break-out, "act of issuing or springing out," 1820, from the verbal phrase, "issue forth, arise, spring up;" see break (v.) + out (adv.). The verbal phrase goes back to Old English ut brecan, utabrecan. Transitive sense is attested from 1610s.

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issue (v.)

mid-14c., of water, etc., "to flow out;" of persons, "come or go (out of a place), sally forth," from issue (n.) or else from Old French issu, past participle of issir. Transitive sense of "to send out" is from mid-15c.; specific sense of "to send out authoritatively" is from c. 1600. Meaning "supply (someone with something)" is from 1925. Related: Issued; issuing.

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burst (n.)

1610s, "act of bursting, a violent rending; a sudden issuing forth," from burst (v.). The meaning "a spurt, an outburst" (of activity, etc.) is from 1862. Jane Austen, Coleridge, Browning use it in a sense of "a sudden opening to sight or view." The earlier noun berst (early Middle English) meant "damage, injury, harm."

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emanation (n.)

"act of flowing or issuing from an origin; emission; radiation; what issues, flows, or is given out from any substance or body;" 1560s, from Late Latin emanationem (nominative emanatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin emanare "flow out, spring out of," figuratively "arise, proceed from," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + manare "to flow," from PIE root *ma- (3) "damp."

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para- (1)

before vowels, par-, word-forming element, originally in Greek-derived words, meaning "alongside, beyond; altered; contrary; irregular, abnormal," from Greek para- from para (prep.) "beside, near; issuing from; against, contrary to," from PIE *prea, from root *per- (1) "forward," hence "toward, near; against." Cognate with Old English for- "off, away." Mostly used in scientific and technical words; not usually regarded as a naturalized formative element in English.

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publication (n.)

late 14c., publicacioun, "the act of making publicly known, notification to the people at large," from Old French publicacion (14c.) and directly from Latin publicationem (nominative publicatio) "a making public; an adjudging to the public treasury," noun of action from past-participle stem of publicare "make public," from publicus (see public (adj.)).

The meaning "the issuing of a written or printed work to the public by sale or distribution" is recorded by 1570s; as the word for the thing so issued and offered, from 1650s. Compare publicization. Parallel publishment existed alongside this word.

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