Etymology
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Isaac 
masc. proper name, name of a biblical patriarch, from Late Latin, from Greek Isaak, from Hebrew Yitzhaq, literally "he laughs," imperf. of tzahaq "he laughed."
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Newton (n.)

unit of force, 1904, named in honor of Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727). Related: Newtonian.

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Esau 
biblical son of Isaac and Rebecca, elder twin who sold his birthright to his brother Jacob for "a mess of pottage" (Genesis xxv), hence "used symbolically for: one who prefers present advantage to permanent rights or interests" [OED].
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surgical (adj.)

1770, earlier chirurgical (early 15c.), from surgery + -ical. Related: Surgically.

surgical strike: There is no such thing. Don't use unless in a quote, then question what that means. [Isaac Cubillos, "Military Reporters Stylebook and Reference Guide," 2010]
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robotics (n.)

"the science of robots, their construction and use," 1941, from robot + -ics. Coined in a science fiction context by Russian-born U.S. author Isaac Asimov (1920-1992), who proposed the "Three Laws of Robotics" in 1968.

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Sarah 

fem. proper name, Biblical wife of Abraham and mother of Isaac, from Hebrew, literally "princess," from sarah, fem. of sar "prince," from sarar "he ruled," which is related to Akkadian sharratu "queen." A popular as a name for girls born in U.S. in 1870s and 1978-2000.

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centripetal (adj.)

"tending or moving toward a center," 1709, from Modern Latin, coined 1687 by Sir Isaac Newton (who wrote in Latin), from Latin centri-, alternative combining form of centrum "center" (see center (n.)) + petere "to make for, go to; seek, strive after" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly"). Centripetal force is Newton's vim ... centripetam.

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Pitman 

surname, attested from c. 1200, literally "dweller by a pit or hollow;" see pit (n.) + man (n.). Meaning "one who works in a pit or mine" is from 1761. As the name of a popular system of shorthand writing, by 1865, from the name of U.S. popular educator Isaac Pitman (1813-97), who devised it in 1837.

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centrifugal (adj.)

"flying off or proceeding out from a center," 1690s, with adjectival suffix -al (1) + Modern Latin centrifugus, 1687, coined by Sir Isaac Newton in "Principia" (which is written in Latin), from Latin centri-, alternative combining form of centrum "center" (see center (n.)) + fugere "to flee" (see fugitive (adj.)). Centrifugal force is Newton's vis centrifuga.

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Rebecca 

fem. proper name, biblical wife of Isaac, mother of Jacob and Esau, from Late Latin Rebecca, from Greek Rhebekka, from Hebrew Ribhqeh, literally "connection" (compare ribhqah "team"), from Semitic base r-b-q "to tie, couple, join" (compare Arabic rabaqa "he tied fast"). Rebekah, the form of the name in the Authorized Version, was taken as the name of a society of women (founded 1851 in Indiana, U.S.) as a complement to the Odd Fellows.

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