Etymology
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invite (v.)

"solicit to come," 1530s, a back-formation from invitation, or else from French inviter (15c.), from Latin invitare "to invite," also "to summon, challenge; to feast, to entertain," a word of uncertain origin. Related: Invited; inviting.

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invite (n.)
"an invitation," 1650s, from invite (v.).
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uninvited (adj.)
"not having been invited," 1630s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of invite (v.).
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inviting (adj.)
"attractive, alluring," c. 1600, present-participle adjective from invite (v.). Related: Invitingly.
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uninvite (v.)
"countermand an invitation," 1660s, from un- (2) "opposite of" + invite (v.). Related: Uninvited; uninviting.
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disinvite (v.)

"recall an invitation to," 1570s; see dis- + invite. Related: Disinvited; disinviting. Compare uninvite.

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reinvite (v.)

also re-invite, "invite again, invite a second time," 1610s, from re- "back, again" + invite (v.). Related: Reinvited; reinviting; reinvitation.

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invitatory (adj.)

"using or containing invitation," 1640s, from Latin invitatorius "inviting," from invitat-, past-participle stem of invitare "to invite, treat, entertain" (see invitation).

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advocacy (n.)
"the act of pleading for, supporting, or recommending," late 14c., from Old French avocacie "profession of an avocat" (14c.), from Medieval Latin advocatia, abstract noun from Latin advocat-, stem of advocare "to call, summon, invite" (see advocate (n.)).
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