Etymology
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extro- 
word-forming element meaning "outwards," a variant of extra- by influence of intro-.
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introvert (v.)

"turn within, direct inward," 1650s, from Latin intro "inward, within" (see intro-) + vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").

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intro- 
word-forming element, from Latin intro (adv.) "in, on the inside, within, to the inside," from PIE *en-t(e)ro-, suffixed form of root *en "in."
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introrse (adj.)
"turned or facing inward," 1831 (earlier in French), from Latin introrsus (adv.) "toward the inside," a contraction of introversus, from intro "within" (see intro-) + versus "turned," past participle of vertere "to turn," from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend."
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introjection (n.)
1856, in medicine, from intro- "on the inside, within" + stem abstracted from projection, interjection. In philosophical (1892) and psychoanalytical (1911) uses, from German introjektion; in the former sense the coinage is credited to Swiss-German philosopher Richard Avenarius (1843-1896), in the latter Sándor Ferenczi (1873-1933).
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introspection (n.)
1670s, "action of closely inspecting or examining," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin introspicere "to look into, look at, examine, observe attentively," from intro- "inward" (see intro-) + specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Meaning "action of searching one's feelings or thoughts" is from 1807.
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introspect (v.)
1680s, "to look into" (transitive), from Latin introspectus, past participle of introspicere "look at, look into; examine, observe attentively," from intro- "inward" (see intro-) + specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Meaning "look within, search one's feelings or thoughts" is from 1875, a back-formation from introspection. Related: Introspected; introspecting.
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introit (n.)
in liturgics, "an antiphon sung as the priest approaches the altar to celebrate mass," late 15c., from Old French introite "(liturgical) introit; entrance" (14c.), from Latin (antiphona ad) introitum, from introitus "a going in, an entering, entrance; a beginning, prelude," past participle of introire "to enter," from intro- "on the inside, within" (see intro-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").
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introduce (v.)

early 15c., "convey or bring (something) in or into," a back-formation from introduction or else from Latin introducere "to lead in, bring in," from intro- "inward, to the inside" (see intro-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead").

Meaning "to bring forward, open to notice" (of a subject, etc.) is from 1550s. Sense of "bring into personal acquaintance, make known" (as of one person to another) is from 1650s. Related: Introduced; introducing.

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