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international (adj.)

1780, coined by Jeremy Bentham from inter- "between" + national (adj.). In the phrase international jurisprudence. He footnotes the word with:

The word international, it must be acknowledged, is a new one; though, it is hoped, sufficiently analogous and intelligible. It is calculated to express, in a more significant way, the branch of law which goes commonly under the name of the law of nations: an appellation so uncharacteristic, that, were it not for the force of custom, it would seem rather to refer to internal jurisprudence. [Bentham, "Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation"]

As a noun and with a capital -i-, it is short for International Working Men's Association, a socialistic worker's movement with global aims, the first chapter of which was founded in London by Marx in 1864. The group lends its name to "The Internationale" (from fem. of French international, which is from English), the socialist hymn, written 1871 by Eugène Pottier. International Dateline is from 1882. Related: Internationally (1821).

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organization (n.)

early 15c., organisacioun, "structure of the body or its parts;" mid-15c., "act or process of organizing, the arranging of parts in an organic whole" from Medieval Latin organizationem (nominative organizatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of organizare, from Latin organum "instrument, organ" (see organ).

Sense of "that which is organized" is by 1707; especially "an organized body of persons" (1829). Meaning "system, establishment, constitution" is from 1873. Disparaging organization man, one who conforms his individuality to the organization he serves, is from the title of the 1956 book by American sociologist William H. Whyte (1917-1999). Related: Organizational.

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Comintern (n.)

"international organization of the Communist Party," founded 1919, from contraction of Communist International and modeled on Russian Komintern.

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peace-keeping (n.)

also peacekeeping, 1961 in the international sense, "regular maintenance by an organization of peace between nations or communities," from peace + keeping, verbal noun from keep (v.). Earlier "preservation of law and order" (mid-15c.), from verbal phrase keep the peace. Related: Peace-keeper (1570s).

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ISBN 
1969, acronym for International Standard Book Number.
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Irgun 
militant Zionist organization, 1946, from Modern Hebrew, literally "organization," in full Irgun Zvai Leumi "national military organization."
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dateline (n.)

also date-line, 1880 as an imaginary line down the Pacific Ocean on which the calendar day begins and ends, from date (n.1) + line (n.). Never set by any treaty or international organization, it is an informal construct meant to coincide with a line 180 degrees (12 hours) from Greenwich, but it always has followed a more or less crooked course.

Meaning "line of text that tells the date and place of origin of a newspaper, article, telegram, etc." is by 1888.

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Interpol 
1952, contraction of international police (in full, The International Criminal Police Commission), founded 1923 with headquarters in Paris.
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internationalism (n.)
1851, from international + -ism. Related: Internationalist.
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SEATO 
1954, acronym for Southeast Asia Treaty Organization.
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