Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for interleave. Showing results for interweave.
interweave (v.)

1570s (trans.), hybrid from inter- + weave (v.). Intransitive sense from 1827. Related: Interweaving; interweaved; interwove; interwoven.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
plat (v.)

"to interweave," late 14c., a variant of plait (v.). Related: Platted; platting.

Related entries & more 
plash (v.2)

"to interlace, to bend and interweave the branches or twigs of," late 15c. (implied in plashing), from Old French plaissier, from Latin plectere "to plait," from suffixed form of PIE root *plek- "to plait." Related: Plashed.

Related entries & more 
text (n.)

late 14c., "wording of anything written," from Old French texte, Old North French tixte "text, book; Gospels" (12c.), from Medieval Latin textus "the Scriptures, text, treatise," in Late Latin "written account, content, characters used in a document," from Latin textus "style or texture of a work," literally "thing woven," from past participle stem of texere "to weave, to join, fit together, braid, interweave, construct, fabricate, build" (from PIE root *teks- "to weave, to fabricate, to make; make wicker or wattle framework"). 

An ancient metaphor: thought is a thread, and the raconteur is a spinner of yarns — but the true storyteller, the poet, is a weaver. The scribes made this old and audible abstraction into a new and visible fact. After long practice, their work took on such an even, flexible texture that they called the written page a textus, which means cloth. [Robert Bringhurst, "The Elements of Typographic Style"]

To Socrates, a word (the name of a thing) is "an instrument of teaching and of separating reality, as a shuttle is an instrument of separating the web." The meaning "a digital text message" is by 2005.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement