Etymology
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decorator (n.)

"one whose business is the decoration of dwellings or public edifices," 1700, agent noun in Latin form from decorate.

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interior (adj.)

late 15c., from Latin interior "inner, interior, middle," comparative adjective of inter "within" (from PIE *enter "between, among," comparative of root *en "in"). Specific meaning "away from the coast, of the interior parts of a country" is from 1777. Interior decoration first attested 1769; interior decorator is from 1830. Interior design from 1927.

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interior (n.)

"part of a country distant from the coast," 1796, from interior (adj.); meaning "internal part, inside" is from 1828. Meaning "internal affairs of a country or state" (as in U.S. Department of the Interior) is from 1826. The Latin adjective also was used as a noun.

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in-country (n.)

"interior regions" of a land, 1560s, from in (prep.) + country.

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inboard (adv.)

"within the hull or interior of a ship," 1830, from in (adv.) + board (n.2).

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up-country (n.)

"interior regions," 1680s, from up- + country (n.). As an adjective from 1810; as an adverb from 1864.

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Muscat 

capital of Oman, from Arabic Masqat, said to mean "hidden" (it is isolated from the interior by hills).

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upholstery (n.)

"upholsterer's work, furniture covered with textile materials, interior fittings made from textiles," 1640s; see upholster + -y (4).

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stomatitis (n.)

"inflammation of the interior of the mouth," 1859, from Greek stomato- (before vowels stomat-), combining form from stem of stoma "mouth" (see stoma) + -itis "inflammation."

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