Etymology
Advertisement
intent (n.)
"purpose," early 13c., from Old French entent, entente "goal, end, aim, purpose; attention, application," and directly from Latin intentus "a stretching out," in Late Latin "intention, purpose," noun use of past participle of intendere "stretch out, lean toward, strain," literally "to stretch out" (see intend). In law, "state of mind with respect to intelligent volition" (17c.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
intent (adj.)
late 14c., "very attentive, eager," from Latin intentus "attentive, eager, waiting, strained," past participle of intendere "to strain, stretch" (see intend). Sense of "having the mind fixed (upon something)" is from c. 1600. Related: Intently.
Related entries & more 
entente (n.)
"an understanding," 1854, from French éntente "an understanding," from Old French entente "intent, intention; attention; aim, goal" (12c.), noun use of fem. past participle of entendre "to direct one's attention" (see intent). Political sense arose in 19c. from entente cordiale (1844); the best-known example was that between England and France (1904), to which Russia was added in 1908.
Related entries & more 
bona fides (n.)

"good faith, fair dealing, freedom from intent to deceive," by 1838, English pluralization of bona fide, as though the Latin phrase were a noun. Sense of "guarantees of good faith" is by 1944. The opposite is mala fides "bad faith, intent to deceive."

Related entries & more 
highwayman (n.)
"one who travels the highways with intent to rob people" (often on horseback and thus contrasted to a footpad), 1640s, from highway + man (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
counterfeiter (n.)

early 15c., "one who imitates or makes a copy of," especially with intent to deceive or defraud, agent noun from counterfeit (v.).

Related entries & more 
careerist (n.)
"person intent on the furtherance of his working or professional career," 1906, from career (n.) + -ist. Related: Careerism.
Related entries & more 
falsely (adv.)
c. 1200, "with intent to deceive, deceitfully," from false + -ly (2). From c. 1300 as "wrongly; untruthfully;" early 14c. as "incorrectly."
Related entries & more 
counterfeiting (n.)

"act or fact of feigning or making a copy of," especially with intent to deceive or defraud; verbal noun from counterfeit (v.). Earlier was counterfeiture (early 14c.).

Related entries & more 
interview (v.)
in early use also enterview, enterveu, 1540s, "to have a personal meeting," from interview (n.). Meaning "have an interview with" (usually with intent to publish what is said" is from 1869. Related: Interviewed; interviewing.
Related entries & more