Etymology
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intensity (n.)
1660s, from intense + -ity. Earlier was intenseness (1610s). A scientific term originally; sense of "extreme depth of feeling" attested by 1830.
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candela (n.)
unit of luminous intensity, 1950, from Latin candela "a light, torch, candle made of tallow or wax" (see candle).
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ardency (n.)
1540s, "warmth of feeling, desire," from ardent + -cy. A figurative sense, the literal meaning "intensity of heat" is attested from 1630s.
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seismometer (n.)
"instrument for measuring the intensity and motion of earthquakes," 1841, from seismo- + -meter. Originally different from a seismograph but now practically the same thing.
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subdued (adj.)
c. 1600, "subjugated," past-participle adjective from subdue. Meaning "calmed down, reduced in intensity" is recorded from 1822.
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keenly (adv.)
Old English cenlice "boldly;" see keen (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "incisively, with intensity, acutely" is from c. 1200; that of "cuttingly" is from 1590s.
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intensive (adj.)
mid-15c., "intense, fervent, great," from Old French intensif (14c.) and Medieval Latin intensivus, from Latin intens-, past participle stem of intendere "turn one's attention; strain, stretch" (see intend).

Grammatical meaning "expressing intensity" is from c. 1600; as a noun, "something expressing intensity," 1813, from the adjective. Alternative intensitive is a malformation. Intensive care attested from 1958. Related: Intensively; intensiveness.
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-acious 
compound adjectival word-forming element of Latin origin, attached to verb stems and expressing intensity of action: "given to, inclined to, abounding in," or expressing intensity of physical or mental action, from Latin -aci- (nominative -ax, accusative -acem), noun ending used with verbal stems (see -acea), + -ous. The accompanying nouns are formed in -acity.
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gauss 
C.G.S. unit of intensity of a magnetic field, 1882, named for German mathematician Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855). Related: Gaussage; gaussian.
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photometer (n.)

"instrument used to measure the intensity of light," 1778, from photo- "light" + -meter "device for measuring." Related: Photometric; photometry (1760).

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