Etymology
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install (v.)

also instal, formerly also enstall, early 15c., "place in (ecclesiastical) office by seating in an official stall," from Old French installer (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin installare, from Latin in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + Medieval Latin stallum "stall," from a Germanic source (compare Old High German stal "standing place;" see stall (n.1)). Related: Installed; installing.

In the church of England the installation of a canon or prebendary of a cathedral consists in solemnly inducting him into his stall in the choir and his place in the chapter. [Century Dictionary]
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installment (n.2)

also instalment, 1580s, "induction into office, act of installing," from install + -ment.

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reinstall (v.)

also re-install, "install again, seat anew," 1590s, from re- "back, again" + install. Related: Reinstalled; reinstalling; reinstalment.

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installation (n.)
mid-15c., "action of installing," in reference to church offices or other positions, from Medieval Latin installationem (nominative installatio), noun of action from past participle stem of installare (see install). Of machinery, etc., "act of setting up, a placing in position for use," from 1882.
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*stel- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place.

It forms all or part of: apostle; catastaltic; diastole; epistle; forestall; Gestalt; install; installment; pedestal; peristalsis; peristaltic; stale (adj.); stalk (n.); stall (n.1) "place in a stable for animals;" stall (n.2) "pretense to avoid doing something;" stall (v.1) "come to a stop, become stuck;" stallage; stallion; stele; stell; still (adj.); stilt; stole (n.); stolid; stolon; stout; stultify; systaltic; systole.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek stellein "to put in order, make ready; equip or dress with weapons, clothes, etc.; prepare (for a journey), dispatch; to furl (sails);" Armenian stełc-anem "to prepare, create;" Albanian shtiell "to wind up, reel up, collect;" Old Church Slavonic po-steljo "I spread;" Old Prussian stallit "to stand;" Old English steall "standing place, stable," Old High German stellen "to set, place."

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chair (v.)
mid-15c., "install in a chair or seat" (implied in chairing), from chair (n.); meaning "preside over" (a meeting, etc.) is attested by 1921. Related: Chaired.
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meter (v.)

"to measure by means of a meter," 1864 (in reference to gas), from meter (n.3). Meaning "install parking meters" is from 1957. In 15c.-16c. it meant "to compose verse, write in metrical verse" (from meter (n.1)), also "to measure." Related: Metered; metering.

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edify (v.)
Origin and meaning of edify
mid-14c., "to build, construct," also, in figurative use, "to build up morally or in faith," from Old French edefiier (12c., Modern French édifier) "build; install; teach, instruct (morally)," from Latin aedificare "to build, construct," in Late Latin "improve spiritually, instruct" (see edifice). Related: Edified; edifying.
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stall (v.1)
"to come to a stand" (intransitive), c. 1400; "to become stuck or be set fast," mid-15c., from Old French estale or Old English steall (see stall (n.1)). Transitive sense "place in office, install" is 14c.; specifically "place an animal in a stall" (late 14c.). Of engines or engine-powered vehicles, it is attested from 1904 (transitive), 1914 (intransitive); of aircraft "to lose lift," 1910. Related: Stalled; stalling.
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inset (n.)
1550s, "influx of water; place where water flows in," from in (prep.) + set (n.2). The sense "that which is set in" ("extra pages of a book, etc.," 1871; "small map in the border of a larger one," 1872) probably is a separate formation. In Old English insetan (Old Northumbrian insetta) meant "an institution," literally "a setting in," and perhaps a loan-translation of the source of institution. Similar formation in German einsetzen "to use, employ; institute, begin; install."
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