Etymology
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inhalation (n.)

1620s, "a breathing in," noun of action from past participle stem of Latin inhalare "breathe upon" (used here as if it meant "to breathe in"), from in- "on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + halare "breathe."

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inhale (v.)

1725, "to breathe in, draw air into the lungs," a back-formation from inhalation or else from French inhaler in this sense; used as a word to be the opposite of exhale. Slang sense of "eat rapidly" is recorded from 1924. As a noun, "act of inhaling," by 1904. Related: Inhaled; inhaling.

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asbestosis (n.)

"lung disease caused by inhalation of asbestos," 1927; see asbestos + -osis.

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silicosis (n.)

"lung disease caused by inhalation of particles of flint," 1881, a hybrid from silicon + -osis.

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nebulizer (n.)

"instrument for reducing a liquid to spray" (for inhalation, etc.), 1865, agent noun from verb nebulize "to reduce to a mist or spray" (1865), from Latin nebula "mist" (see nebula) + -ize. Related: Nebulization.

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pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (n.)

1962, "A facetious word alleged to mean 'a lung disease caused by the inhalation of very fine silica dust' but occurring chiefly as an instance of a very long word" [OED]. Said in an early reference to have been invented by seventh grade students in Norfolk, Virginia.

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toke (n.)

"inhalation of a marijuana cigarette or pipe smoke," 1968, U.S. slang, from earlier verb meaning "to smoke a marijuana cigarette" (1952), perhaps from Spanish tocar in sense of "touch, tap, hit" or "get a share or part." In 19c. the same word in British slang meant "small piece of poor-quality bread," but probably this is not related.

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respiration (n.)

late 14c., respiracioun, "act or process of breathing, inhalation and exhalation of air by the lungs," from Latin respirationem (nominative respiratio) "breathing, respiration," noun of action from past-participle stem of respirare "breathe again, breathe in and out," from re- "again" (see re-) + spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)). Extended to plants by 1831. Milton used it for "act of returning to life" ("breathing again").

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