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information (n.)

late 14c., informacion, "act of informing, communication of news," from Old French informacion, enformacion "advice, instruction," from Latin informationem (nominative informatio) "outline, concept, idea," noun of action from past participle stem of informare "to train, instruct, educate; shape, give form to" (see inform). The restored Latin spelling is from 16c.

Meaning "knowledge communicated concerning a particular topic" is from mid-15c. The word was used in reference to television broadcast signals from 1937; to punch-card operating systems from 1944; to DNA from 1953. Information theory is from 1950; information technology is from 1958 (coined in "Harvard Business Review"); information revolution, to be brought about by advances in computing, is from 1966. Information overload is by 1967.

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info- 
word-forming element abstracted from information.
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informatics (n.)
1967, translating Russian informatika (1966); see information + -ics.
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misinformation (n.)

1580s, "action of misinforming;" 1660s, "wrong or false information," from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + information.

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disinformation (n.)

"The dissemination of deliberately false information, esp. when supplied by a government or its agent to a foreign power or to the media, with the intention of influencing the policies or opinions of those who receive it" [OED], 1955, from Russian dezinformatsiya (1949), which is said to be from French désinformation, but the French word is not as old as the Russian one; see dis- + information.

Simply put, disinformation is a falsehood created with the intention to cause harm. Misinformation is also false, but created or shared without the intention to deceive others. [New York Times, Oct. 26, 2020]
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ASCII 
1963, initialism (acronym) from "American Standard Code for Information Interchange."
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informer (n.)
late 14c., enfourmer "instructor, one who teaches or gives advice," from inform (Middle English enfourmen) and also from Old French enformeor. Meaning "one who communicates information" is mid-15c.; sense of "one who gives information against another" (especially in reference to law-breaking) is c. 1500.
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poop (n.3)
"up-to-date information," 1941, in poop sheet, U.S. Army slang, of unknown origin, perhaps from poop (n.2).
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