Etymology
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feeding (n.)

"act of taking food," Old English feding, verbal noun from feed (v.). Feeding frenzy is from 1989, metaphoric extension of a phrase that had been used of sharks since 1950s.

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infant (n.)
Origin and meaning of infant
late 14c., infant, infaunt, "a child," also especially "child during earliest period of life, a newborn" (sometimes meaning a fetus), from Latin infantem (nominative infans) "young child, babe in arms," noun use of adjective meaning "not able to speak," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + fans, present participle of fari "to speak," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say." As an adjective in English, 1580s, from the noun.

The Romans extended the sense of Latin infans to include older children, hence French enfant "child," Italian fanciullo, fanciulla. In English the word formerly also had the wider sense of "child" (commonly reckoned as up to age 7). The common Germanic words for "child" (represented in English by bairn and child) also are sense extensions of words that originally must have meant "newborn."
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suckling (n.)
mid-15c., "infant at the breast," from suck + diminutive suffix -ling. Similar formation in Middle Dutch sogeling, Dutch zuigeling, German Säugling. Meaning "calf or other young mammal" is from 1520s. Meaning "act of breast-feeding" is attested from 1799. Adjectival sense "not yet weaned" is from 1799.
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infantile (adj.)
mid-15c., "pertaining to infants," from Late Latin infantilis "pertaining to an infant," from infans "young child" (see infant). Sense of "infant-like" is from 1772.
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force-feed (v.)
by 1905 in animal husbandry, from force (n.) + feed (v.). Related: Force-fed; force-feeding. Force-feeding (n.) is from 1900.
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SIDS (n.)
1970, acronym for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.
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larvivorous (adj.)

"feeding on grubs and caterpillars," 1863; see larva + -vorous.

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phyllophagous (adj.)

"leaf-eating, feeding on leaves," 1819, from phyllo- "leaf" + -phagous "eating."

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bird-seed (n.)
also birdseed, "small seed used for feeding birds," 1736, from bird (n.1) + seed (n.).
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carnivorous (adj.)
"eating or feeding on flesh," 1640s, from Latin carnivorus "flesh-eating, feeding on flesh," from caro (genitive carnis) "flesh" (originally "a piece of flesh," from PIE root *sker- (1) "to cut") + vorare "to devour" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Related: Carnivorously; carnivorousness; carnivoracity.
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