Etymology
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inconvenience (n.)

c. 1400, "harm, damage; danger; misfortune, affliction," from Old French inconvenience "misfortune, calamity; impropriety" (Modern French inconvenance), from Late Latin inconvenientia "lack of consistency, incongruity" (in Medieval Latin "misfortune, affliction"), abstract noun from inconvenientem (see inconvenient). Sense of "impropriety, unfitness; an improper act or utterance" in English is from early 15c. Meaning "quality of being inconvenient" is from 1650s.

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inconvenience (v.)

"to give trouble, impede, or hamper" (someone), 1650s, from inconvenience (n.). Related: Inconvenienced; inconveniencing.

The early Spanish missionaries in America were inconvenienced by finding that the only native word they could use for God also meant devil. [Herbert Spencer, "The Principles of Sociology," 1877]
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inconveniency (n.)

early 15c., "calamity, injury, harmful consequence," also "danger" (now obsolete), from Late Latin inconvenientia (see inconvenience (n.)). Meaning "trouble, disadvantage, quality of being inconvenient" is from 1550s.

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incommodity (n.)

early 15c., from Old French incommodité (14c.), from Latin incommoditas "inconvenience, disadvantage; damage, injury," from incommodus "inconvenient, unsuitable, troublesome," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + commodus "suitable, convenient" (see commode).

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suffering (n.)

"patient enduring of pain, inconvenience, loss, etc.," mid-14c.; "undergoing of punishment, affliction, etc.," late 14c., verbal noun from suffer (v.). Meaning "a painful condition, pain felt" is from late 14c.

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encumber (v.)

early 14c., "burden, vex, inconvenience," from Old French encombrer "to block up, hinder, thwart," from Late Latin incombrare, from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + combrus "barricade, obstacle," probably from Latin cumulus "heap" (see cumulus). Meaning "hinder, hamper" is attested in English from late 14c. Related: Encumbered; encumbering.

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screen (v.)

"to shield from punishment, protect from inconvenience or danger; to conceal," late 15c., from screen (n.). Meaning "sift by passing through a screen" is by 1660s; the meaning "examine systematically for suitability" is from 1943, a word from World War II. The sense of "release a movie" is from 1915. The U.S. sporting sense is by 1922. Related: Screened; screening.

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gravamen (n.)

1640s, "grievance," from Late Latin gravamen "trouble, physical inconvenience" (in Medieval Latin, "a grievance"), literally "a burden," from Latin gravare "to burden, make heavy, weigh down; oppress," from gravis "heavy" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy"). Specifically, in law, "part of the accusation which weighs most heavily against the accused." Related: Gravaminous.

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disoblige (v.)

c. 1600, "to free from obligation;" 1630s, "to refuse or neglect to oblige," from French désobliger (c. 1300), from des- (see dis-) + obliger, from Latin obligare "to bind, bind up, bandage," figuratively "put under obligation," from ob "to" (see ob-) + ligare "to bind," from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind."

Colloquial sense of "put to inconvenience" is from 1650s (implied in disobligingness). Related: Disobliged; disobliging; disobligingly.

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disease (n.)

early 14c., "discomfort, inconvenience, distress, trouble," from Old French desaise "lack, want; discomfort, distress; trouble, misfortune; disease, sickness," from des- "without, away" (see dis-) + aise "ease" (see ease (n.)). Restricted pathological sense of "sickness, illness" in English emerged by late 14c.; the word still sometimes was used in its literal sense early 17c., and was somewhat revived 20c., usually with a hyphen (dis-ease).

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