Etymology
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inability (n.)
mid-15c., inhabilite, "disqualification for office," from in- (1) + ability. Earlier was unability "incapability; incompetence" (late 14c.). General sense "state of being unable" is recorded by c. 1500.
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incontinence (n.)
late 14c., "inability to restrain sexual desire, sexual immorality," later "inability to keep to a religious rule" (early 15c.), from Old French incontinence "lack of abstinence, unchastity" (12c.) or directly from Latin incontinentia "greediness; incontinence, inability to contain," abstract noun from incontinens "incontinent, immoderate, intemperate" (see incontinent). Meaning "inability to restrain bodily functions" is from 1754.
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muteness (n.)

"dumbness, forbearance from speaking or inability to speak," 1580s, from mute (adj.) + -ness.

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dumbness (n.)

"inability to speak," Middle English dombenesse, from Old English dumbnes; see dumb (adj.) + -ness. As "stupidity," by 1858.

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prosopagnosia (n.)

"inability to recognize faces," 1950, Medical Latin from German prosopagnosie (1948), from Greek prosopon "face" (see prosopopeia) + agnosia "ignorance" (see agnostic).

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aphagia (n.)
"inability to swallow," 1854, from a- (3) "not, without" + abstract noun from Greek phagein "to eat" (from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share").
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illiteracy (n.)
1650s, "inability to read and write," from illiterate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Earlier in this sense was illiterature (1590s).
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anhedonia (n.)

"inability to feel pleasure," 1897, from French anhédonie, coined 1896 by French psychologist Theodule Ribot as an opposite to analgesia, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + hedone "pleasure" (see hedonist) + abstract noun ending -ia.

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impossibility (n.)

late 14c., "quality of being impossible," from impossible + -ity; perhaps from or modeled on Old French impossibilité (14c.). Meaning "an impossible thing or occurrence" is from c. 1500. Sometimes in English 15c.-18c. it meant "inability, impotence," after a use of Medieval Latin impossibilitas.

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insomnia (n.)
"chronic inability to sleep," 1620s, insomnie, from Latin insomnia "want of sleep, sleeplessness," from insomnis "sleepless," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + somnus "sleep" (from PIE root *swep- "to sleep"). The re-Latinized form is from 1758.
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