Etymology
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impure (adj.)

mid-15c., of wine, "muddy, not clear," from Old French impur (13c.), from Latin impurus "not pure, unclean, filthy, foul," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + purus "pure" (see pure).

In English, the subsequent order of sense appearance seems to be "earthly, mundane, not spiritual" (c. 1500); "obscene, lewd, unchaste, immoral" (1530s); "mixed with offensive matter, tainted" (1590s); "mixed or combined with other things" (without reference to foulness), 1620s. As a noun from 1784. Related: Impurely.

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Impuritan (n.)

"one who is not a Puritan," 1610s, a hostile coinage of the Puritans, from im- "not, opposite of" + Puritan, perhaps also with suggestion of impure.

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impurity (n.)

mid-15c., impurite, "thing which makes or is impure;" c. 1500, "fact or quality of being impure," from Latin impuritas "uncleanness" (in a moral sense), from impurus "not pure" (see impure). Related: Impurities.

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unclean (adj.)

Old English unclæne, "morally impure, defiled, unfit for food," from un- (1) "not" + clean (adj.). Literal sense of "dirty" is recorded from mid-13c.

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matte (n.2)

in metallurgy, "impure and unfinished product of the smelting of copper or other ores," 1839, from French matte, from the adjective meaning "dull, dim" (see mat (adj.)).

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polluter (n.)

1540s, "one who renders unclean or impure, one who profanes," agent noun from pollute (v.). Ecological sense is by 1958.

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capsaicin 

active component of chili peppers, 1851, from capsicum, the genus name of the plants from which it is extracted, + chemical suffixes. Capsicine (1816) was an earlier name of an impure form of it.

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polluted (adj.)

late 14c., "ceremonially unclean, profane;" c. 1400, "rendered impure or unclean," past-participle adjective from pollute (v.). Meaning "drunk" is from 1912, American English slang; ecological sense is by 1888.

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sophisticated (adj.)

c. 1600, "mixed with a foreign substance, impure; no longer simple or natural," past-participle adjective from sophisticate (v.). Of persons, with a positive sense, "worldly-wise, discriminating, cultured," from 1895.

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sophisticate (v.)

c. 1400, "make impure by admixture," from Medieval Latin sophisticatus, past participle of sophisticare (see sophistication). From c. 1600 as "corrupt, delude by sophistry;" from 1796 as "deprive of simplicity." Related: Sophisticated; sophisticating. As a noun meaning "sophisticated person" from 1921.

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