Etymology
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impotence (n.)

early 15c., "physical weakness," also "poverty," from Old French impotence "weakness" (13c.), from Latin impotentia "lack of control or power," from impotentem "lacking control, powerless" (see impotent). In reference to a complete want of (male) sexual potency, from c. 1500. The figurative senses of the word in Latin were "violence, fury, unbridled passion," via the notion of "want of self-restraining power," and these sometimes were used in English. Related: Impotency.

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numbnuts (n.)

stupid or ineffectual person, by 1971, U.S. slang, from numb (adj.) + nuts "testicles;" with suggestion of impotence.

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frigidity (n.)

early 15c., frigidite, "coldness," from Old French frigidité (15c.), from Late Latin frigiditatem (nominative frigiditas) "the cold," from Latin frigidus "cold" (see frigid). In reference to sexual impotence, 1580s, originally of men; by 1903 of women.

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erotica (n.)

1820, noun use of neuter plural of Greek erotikos "amatory" (see erotic); originally a booksellers' catalogue heading.

Force Flame
And with a Blonde push
Over your impotence
Flits Steam
[Emily Dickinson, #854, c. 1864]
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impossibility (n.)

late 14c., "quality of being impossible," from impossible + -ity; perhaps from or modeled on Old French impossibilité (14c.). Meaning "an impossible thing or occurrence" is from c. 1500. Sometimes in English 15c.-18c. it meant "inability, impotence," after a use of Medieval Latin impossibilitas.

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imbecility (n.)

early 15c., imbecilite, "physical weakness, feebleness (of a body part), impotence," from Old French imbécillité and directly from Latin imbecillitatem (nominative imbecillitas) "weakness, feebleness, helplessness," from imbecillus "weak, feeble," of uncertain origin (see imbecile). "Weakness in mind" (as opposed to body) was a secondary sense in Latin but was not attested in English until 1620s.

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non-violent (adj.)

also nonviolent, "using peaceful means," especially to bring about change in a society,  1896, from non- + violent (adj.). From 1920 in reference to "principle or practice of abstaining from violence," in writings of M.K. Gandhi.

It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. [Gandhi, "Non-violence in Peace and War," 1948]
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