Etymology
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immoderate (adj.)
"excessive, extreme, lacking moderation," late 14c., from Latin immoderatus "boundless, immeasurable," figuratively "unrestrained, excessive," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + moderatus "within bounds, observing moderation;" figuratively "modest, restrained," past participle of moderari "to regulate, mitigate, restrain, temper, set a measure, keep (something) within measure," from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Related: Immoderately.
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immoderation (n.)
early 15c., from Latin immoderationem (nominative immoderatio) "want of moderation, excess," from immoderatus "unrestrained, excessive" (see immoderate).
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*med- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "take appropriate measures."

It forms all or part of: accommodate; accommodation; commode; commodious; commodity; empty; immoderate; immodest; Medea; medical; medicament; medicaster; medicate; medication; medicine; medico; medico-; meditate; meditation; Medusa; meet (adj.) "proper, fitting;" mete (v.) "to allot;" modal; mode; model; moderate; modern; modest; modicum; modify; modular; modulate; module; modulation; mold (n.1) "hollow shape;" mood (n.2) "grammatical form indicating the function of a verb;" must (v.); premeditate; premeditation; remedial; remediation; remedy.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit midiur "I judge, estimate;" Avestan vi-mad- "physician;" Greek mēdomai "be mindful of," medesthai "think about," medein "to rule," medon "ruler;" Latin meditari "think or reflect on, consider," modus "measure, manner," modestus "moderate," modernus "modern," mederi "to heal, give medical attention to, cure;" Irish miduir "judge;" Welsh meddwl "mind, thinking;" Gothic miton, Old English metan "to measure out."

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outrageous (adj.)

c. 1300, "excessive, extravagant, exorbitant, immoderate," from Old French outrageus, outrajos "immoderate, excessive, violent, lawless" (Modern French outrageux), from outrage, oltrage, from Vulgar Latin *ultraticum "excess," from Latin ultra "beyond" (from suffixed form of PIE root *al- "beyond"). Meaning "flagrantly evil, atrocious" is late 14c.; modern teen slang usages of it unwittingly approach the original and etymological sense of outrage. Related: Outrageously; outrageousness.

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overdone (adj.)

late Old English ofer-done "carried to excess, immoderate, too much;" see overdo. Of meat, etc., "cooked too much," from 1680s.

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unmeet (adj.)
Old English unmæte "immoderate, excessive," from un- (1) "not" + meet (adj.). Similar formation in Old High German unmazi. Meanings "unfitting" and "unsuited" (for some purpose) are from 1520s.
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ingurgitation (n.)
"immoderate eating and drinking," 1520s, from Late Latin ingurgitationem (nominative ingurgitatio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin ingurgitare "plunge into, gorge," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + gurgitare "to engulf," from gurges "whirlpool, gorge" (see gurges).
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luxurious (adj.)
c. 1300, "lascivious, lecherous, unchaste," from Old French luxurios "lustful, lascivious" (Modern French luxurieux), from Latin luxuriosus "immoderate, excessive; voluptuous; profuse," from luxuria "excess, profusion; extravagant living" (see luxury). Meaning "given to luxury, voluptuous" (of persons) is from c. 1600. Of things, "characterized by luxury," from 1640s. Related: Luxuriously; luxuriousness.
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excessive (adj.)

"exceeding the usual or proper limit, degree, measure, or proportion; going beyond what is sanctioned by correct principles; immoderate; extravagant; unreasonable;" late 14c., from Old French excessif "excessive, oppressive," from Latin excess-, past-participle stem of excedere "to depart, go beyond" (see exceed). Related: Excessively; excessiveness.

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overmuch (adj.)

"too great in amount, excessive, immoderate," c. 1300, from over- + much (q.v.). As an adverb, "excessively, immoderately," from late 14c. As a noun, "an excessive amount," c. 1300. Old English had cognate ofermicel. Middle English had also overmore "further, in addition, moreover" (late 14c.). 

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