Etymology
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imbrue (v.)
early 15c., "to soak, steep;" mid-15c., "to stain, soil," from Old French embruer "to moisten," which probably is a metathesis of embevrer "give to drink, make drunk," from em- (see em-) + -bevrer, ultimately from Latin bibere "to drink" (from PIE root *po(i)- "to drink"). Or perhaps from Old French embroue "soiled," ultimately from boue "mud, dirt."
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*po(i)- 
*pō(i)-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to drink."

It forms all or part of: beer; bever; beverage; bib; bibitory; bibulous; hibachi; imbibe; imbrue; pinocytosis; pirogi; poison; potable; potation; potion; symposium.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit pati "drinks," panam "beverage;" Greek pinein "to drink," poton "that which one drinks," potos "drinking bout;" Latin potare "to drink," potio "a potion, a drinking," also "poisonous draught, magic potion;" Old Church Slavonic piti "to drink," pivo "beverage."
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