Etymology
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identification (n.)

1640s, "treating of a thing as the same as another; act of making or proving to be the same," from French identification, probably from identifier (see identify). Psychological sense of "becoming or feeling oneself one with another" is from 1857. Meaning "act or process of determining the identity of something" is from 1859. Meaning "object or document which marks identity" is from 1947 (short for identification tag, card, etc.).

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misidentification (n.)

"erroneous identification," 1858, from mis- (1) + identification.

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I.D. 

also ID (but pronounced as separate letters), short for identification, attested from 1955.

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PIN 

acronym for personal identification number, 1981; from the first it has been used with a redundant number.

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dog-tag (n.)

"soldier's identity disk," 1918, U.S. slang, from dog (n.) + tag (n.1). So called perhaps from resemblance to the identification/license tag on dog collars.

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mug-shot (n.)

also mugshot, "photograph taken by police of a person after an arrest for identification purposes," 1950; see mug (n.2) "a person's face" + shot (n.) in the photographic sense.

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card (v.1)

1540s, "to play cards" (now obsolete), from card (n.1). From 1925 as "to write (something) on a card for filing." Meaning "require (someone) to show an identification card" is from 1970s. Related: Carded; carding.

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merry-andrew (n.)

"a buffoon; a zany; a jack-pudding" [Johnson], "One whose business it is to make sport for others by jokes and ridiculous posturing" [Century Dictionary], according to OED, in early use properly a mountebank's assistant, 1670s, from merry + masc. proper name Andrew, but there is no certain identification with an individual, and the name here may be generic.

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radium (n.)

radioactive metallic alkaline earth element, 1899, from French radium, formed in Modern Latin from Latin radius "ray" (see radius). With metallic element ending -ium. Named 1898 after identification by Marie Curie and her husband; so called for its power of emitting energy in the form of rays.

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solipsism (n.)

1871, coined from Latin solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)) + ipse "self." The view or theory that self is the only object of real knowledge or the only thing that is real. "The identification of one's self with the Absolute is not generally intended, but the denial of there being really anybody else" [Century Dictionary].

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