Etymology
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identical (adj.)
1610s as a term in logic; general sense of "being the same or very similar" is from 1630s, from Medieval Latin identicus "the same," from Late Latin identitas "identity, sameness," ultimately from combining form of Latin idem "the same" (see idem). Replaced Middle English idemptical (late 15c.), from Medieval Latin idemptitas "identity," from Latin idem. Related: Identically.
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dizygotic (adj.)

of twins, "not identical, from two different eggs," 1917, from di- + zygote + -ic.

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selfsame 
"identical," early 15c., from self + same. Written as two words until c. 1600.
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homo- (2)
word-forming element meaning "homosexual," abstracted since early 20c. from homosexual, and ultimately identical to homo- (1).
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isopolity (n.)
"equality of citizenship rights between different states," 1827, in reference to ancient Rome, from iso- "equal, identical" + polity.
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pantheist (n.)

"one who holds the doctrines of pantheism; one who believes God and the universe are identical," 1705, see pantheism + -ist.

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sandwich (v.)

"insert between two other things," 1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of meat pressed between identical pieces of bread. Related: Sandwiched; sandwiching.

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isomer (n.)
1852, in chemistry, back-formation from isomeric. A compound identical or nearly so in composition and molecular weight with another, but having different properties.
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godly (adj.)
late 14c., from god + -ly (1). Perhaps earlier, but due to identical spelling in Middle English it is difficult to distinguish from goodly. Related: Godlily.
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