Etymology
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Celt-Iberian (adj.)

also Celtiberian, "pertaining to the ancient province, people, or culture of northwestern Spain, c. 1600, from Latin Celtiberi; see Celt + Iberia.

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Hispania 
Latin name for the Iberian peninsula, literally "country of the Spaniards;" see Hispanic.
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izard (n.)
chamois-like antelope of the Pyrenees, 1791, from French isard, Gascon isart, "perhaps of Iberian origin" (according to French sources), or [Klein] from Basque (which has izzara "star").
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calabash (n.)
"dried, hollowed gourd used as a drinking cup," 1650s, callebass, from Spanish calabaza, possibly from Arabic qar'a yabisa "dry gourd," from Persian kharabuz, used of various large melons; or from a pre-Roman Iberian *calapaccia. As "the fruit of the calabash tree" (from which the cups were made) from 1590s.
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bay (n.1)
"inlet, recess in the shore of a sea or lake," c. 1400, from Old French baie, Late Latin baia (source of Spanish and Portuguese bahia, Italian baja), which is perhaps ultimately from Iberian (Celtic) bahia.
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Portugal 

country on the west side of the Iberian peninsula, late 14c., Portyngale, from Medieval Latin Portus Cale (the Roman name of modern Oporto), "the port of Gaya," from Latin portus "harbor, port" (see port (n.1), also port (n.5)). Alfonso, Count of Portucale, became the first king of Portugal.

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alfalfa (n.)

1845, from Spanish alfalfa, earlier alfalfez, said by Iberian sources to be from Arabic al-fisfisa "fresh fodder." Watkins says ultimately from Old Iranian compound *aspa-sti- "alfalfa, clover," from *aspa- "horse" (from PIE root *ekwo- "horse") + -sti- "food," from suffixed form of PIE root *ed- "to eat."

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rusk (n.)

"light, crisp bits of hard bread or biscuit" ("formerly much used on board ships" - OED), 1590s, from Spanish or Portuguese rosca "roll, twist of bread," literally "coil, anything round and spiral," a word of unknown origin, perhaps from a pre-Latin Iberian language.

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Hispanic (adj.)
"pertaining to Spain" (especially ancient Spain) 1580s, from Latin Hispanicus, from Hispania "Iberian Peninsula," from Hispanus "Spaniard" (see Spaniard). Specific application to Spanish-speaking parts of the New World is from 1889, American English; since c. 1972 especially applied to Spanish-speaking persons of Latin American descent living in the U.S. As a noun meaning "Hispanic person" from 1972.
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barrack (n.)
1680s, "temporary hut for soldiers during a siege," from French barraque, from Spanish barraca (mid-13c. in Medieval Latin) "soldier's tent," literally "cabin, hut," a word of unknown origin. Perhaps from Celt-Iberian or Arabic. Meaning "permanent building for housing troops" (usually in plural) is attested from 1690s.
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