Etymology
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expedition (n.)

early 15c., expedicioun, "military campaign; the act of rapidly setting forth," from Old French expedicion "an expediting, implementation; expedition, mission" (13c.) and directly from Latin expeditionem (nominative expeditio) "an enterprise against an enemy, a military campaign," noun of action from past-participle stem of expedire "make ready, prepare" (see expedite). Meaning "journey for some purpose" is from 1590s. Sense by 1690s also included the body of persons on such a journey.

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hunting (n.)

modification of Old English huntung "a hunt, chase; what is hunted, game," verbal noun from hunt (v.). Bartlett (1848) notes it as the word commonly used by sportsmen in the Southern states of the U.S. where in the North they use gunning. Happy hunting-grounds "Native American afterlife paradise" is from "Last of the Mohicans" (1826); hunting-ground in a Native American context is from 1777.

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fox-hunting (n.)

1670s, from fox (n.) + hunting (n.). Fox-hunt (n.) is by 1807; it also is known as a fox-chase. Related: Fox-hunter.

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safari (n.)

1890 (attested from 1860 as a foreign word), "an expedition over country in East Africa lasting days or weeks," especially for hunting, from Swahili, "journey, expedition," from Arabic, literally "referring to a journey," from safar "journey" (which itself is attested in English as a foreign word from 1858). Used from 1920s of various articles of clothing suitable for safaris.

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expeditionary (adj.)

"pertaining to or being of the nature of an expedition," 1803, from expedition + -ary.

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outfit (n.)

1769, "act of fitting out (a ship, etc.) for an expedition," from out- + fit (v.). Sense of "articles and equipment required for an expedition" is attested from 1787, American English, hence the extended senses; meaning "a person's clothes" is first recorded 1852; sense of "group of people" is from 1883.

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snowmobile (n.)

1931, in reference to Admiral Byrd's expedition, from snow (n.) + ending from automobile, etc.

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colonist (n.)

1701, "colonizer, member of a colonizing expedition," from colony + -ist. Meaning "inhabitant of a colony" is from 1749.

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raid (n.)

early 15c., "mounted military expedition," Scottish and northern English form of rade "a riding, journey," from Old English rad "a riding, ride, expedition, journey; raid," (see road). The word fell into obscurity by 17c., but it was revived by Scott ("The Lay of the Last Minstrel," 1805; "Rob Roy," 1818), with a more extended sense of "attack, foray, hostile or predatory incursion." By 1873 of any sudden or vigorous descent (police raids, etc.). Of air raids by 1908.

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dig (n.)

late 17c., "a tool for digging," from dig (v.). Meaning "archaeological expedition" is from 1896. Meaning "a thrust or poke" (as with an elbow) is from 1819; figurative sense of this is by 1840.

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