Etymology
Advertisement
humorous (adj.)

early 15c., in physiology and medicine, "relating to the body humors, characterized by an abundance of humors," a native formation from humor (n.), or else from Medieval Latin humorosus. In Shakespeare also "whimsical, full of fancies" (1580s); "ill-humored, peevish, moody" (c. 1600). The meaning "funny, exciting laughter" dates from 1705 in English. Related: Humorously; humorousness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Falstaffian (adj.)
"fat, humorous, jovial," 1782, from Shakespeare's character.
Related entries & more 
critter (n.)
1815, dialectal or humorous pronunciation of creature.
Related entries & more 
nob (n.1)

"the head," c. 1700, a slang or humorous variant of knob (q.v.).

Related entries & more 
jakes (n.)
"a privy," mid-15c., genitive singular of jack (n.), perhaps a humorous euphemism.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
fluonomist (n.)
said to be a humorous title for a chimney-sweep, 1947 according to OED, from flue + ending from economist, etc.
Related entries & more 
enthuse (v.)
1827, American English, back-formation from enthusiasm. Originally often humorous or with affected ignorance. Related: enthused; enthusing.
Related entries & more 
half-assed (adj.)
"ineffectual," 1932; "Dictionary of American Slang" suggests it is perhaps a humorous mispronunciation of haphazard. Compare half-hearted.
Related entries & more 
bumptious (adj.)
"offensively assertive," 1803, probably a humorous slang coinage from bump on the pattern of fractious, etc. Related: Bumptiously; bumptiousness.
Related entries & more 
nite (n.)

arbitrary respelling of night, attested by 1920. OED calls it "A widespread vulgarism." It appears earlier in humorous representations of semi-literate spelling.

Related entries & more