Etymology
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horizontal (adj.)
1550s, "relating to or near the horizon," from French horizontal, from Latin horizontem (see horizon). Meaning "flat" (i.e., "parallel to the horizon") is from 1630s. As a noun also from 1550s. Related: horizontally.
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stabilizer (n.)
1909 in aeronautical sense, agent noun from stabilize (v.).
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mantelpiece (n.)

"the horizontal shelf or hood above a fireplace," 1680s, from mantel + piece (n.1).

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equilibrium (n.)
c. 1600, "state of mental balance," from Latin aequilibrium "an even balance; a horizontal position," from aequilibris "equal, level, horizontal, evenly balanced," from aequus "equal" (see equal (adj.)) + libra "a balance, pair of scales, plummet" (see Libra). Related: Equilibrious.
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bail (n.2)

"horizontal piece of wood in a cricket wicket," c. 1742, originally "a cross bar" of any sort (1570s), probably identical with French bail "horizontal piece of wood affixed on two stakes," and with English bail "palisade wall, outer wall of a castle" (see bailey). From 1904 as the hinged bar which holds the paper against the platen of a typewriter.

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paling (n.)

"fence formed by connecting pointed vertical stakes by horizontal rails above and below," 1550s, from pale (n.).

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fess (n.)
wide horizontal band across an escutcheon, late 15c., from Old French faisce, from Latin fascia "a band" (see fasces).
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sawfish (n.)

also saw-fish, "selachian fish having a long, flat snout with horizontal projecting teeth" (used in killing prey), 1660s; see saw (n.1.) + fish (n.).

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level (adj.)
early 15c., "having an even surface," from level (n.). Meanings "lying on or constituting a horizontal surface" and "lying in the same horizontal plane" (as something else) are from 1550s. To do one's level best is U.S. slang from 1851, from level in the sense "well-aimed, direct, straight." Level playing field as a figure of equality of opportunity is from 1981. Related: Levelly.
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pole-vault (n.)

"a jump over a horizontal bar by means of a pole," 1877, from pole (n.1) + vault (n.2). As a verb from 1892 (implied in pole-vaulting). Related: Pole-vaulted; pole-vaulter.

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