Etymology
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homo (n.)

short for homosexual (n.), attested by 1929, usually contemptuous; as an adjective by 1933.

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homo- (2)

word-forming element meaning "homosexual," abstracted since early 20c. from homosexual, and ultimately identical to homo- (1).

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homogamy (n.)

1805, "condition of bearing flowers that do not differ sexually," from homo- (1) "same" + -gamy.

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homoerotic (adj.)

also homo-erotic, 1916, from homo- (2) "homosexual" + erotic. Related: Homoeroticism.

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homozygous (adj.)

1902, from homo- (1) "same" + zygote + -ous. Related: homozygote (1902).

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homophile (n.)

1960, from homo- (2) "homosexual" + -phile. An attempt to coin a word for a homosexual person as part of a social group, rather than a sexual deviant.

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homo- (1)

before vowels hom-, word-forming element meaning "same, the same, equal, like" (opposed to hetero-), from Greek homos "one and the same," also "belonging to two or more jointly" (from PIE *somo-, from root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with").

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homograph (n.)

1810 as a method of signalling, from homo- (1) "same" + -graph "something written." Meaning "a word of identical spelling with another, but of different origin and meaning," is from 1873. Related: Homographic; homography. Greek homographos meant "of the same letters."

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homophobic (adj.)

by 1908, originally "fear of humans," from homo- (2) "homosexual" (ultimately from Latin homo "man, male human; human being") + phobia + -ic.

[H]e imported a whole boxcar of broncos from the West, homophobic mustangs, as it turned out, that nobody but a rodeo hand could have ridden. [F. Reid Buckley, Life Magazine, 1970]

The "fear of homosexuals" sense is attested by 1969, from homo- (2) "homosexual" + -phobia + -ic. Even early on the term was used with a tinge of "unreasonable or abusive fear of homosexuals" and in current use it typically implies or asserts an active hatred. Related: Homophobe; homophobia 

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homologous (adj.)

"having the same position, value, structure, etc.," 1650s, from Latinized form of Greek homologos "agreeing, of one mind," from homos "same" (see homo- (1)) + logos "relation, reasoning, computation," related to legein "reckon, select, speak," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."

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